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Miguel Gutierrez Jr. /KUT News

The head of the largest Latino advocacy group in the U.S. says both major political parties in Texas dropped the ball on Latino voter outreach this year.


MARJORIE KAMYS COTERA / TEXAS TRIBUNE

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is now almost certain to stand trial on criminal fraud charges. That’s because the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals today refused Paxton’s last request to have the felony indictments dismissed.

KUT's Nathan Bernier learns more from Dallas Morning News reporter Lauren McGaughy.


Tamir Kalifa / Texas Tribune

Texans across the state will soon be inundated with TV and radio ads ahead of this year’s presidential election. However, the ads won't be from candidates running for office, but from the state of Texas. The state-funded ads are intended to inform voters of the recent court-ordered changes to Texas' voter ID law.

Bill Clark for Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: The highest criminal court in Texas said Wednesday it will not hear Ken Paxton's appeal of securities fraud charges, putting the attorney general on a path to facing a trial in the coming months. 

Nathan Bernier / KUT

Today is the last possible day to register to vote in Texas. And, if you haven’t gotten around to registering, don't worry. We got you.

Here are some of your options:

If you already have a voter registration form sitting around in your house and you just haven’t mailed it in, make sure you mail it in and get it postmarked by midnight today. 

If you don’t have a form, in-person registration is the way to go. In Austin, you have a lot of spots for that because two local businesses are working with Travis County’s voter registrar to help voters get registered today.

90 Percent of Travis County Is Registered to Vote

Oct 11, 2016
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Travis County reached a voter registration milestone ahead of this year’s presidential election. Local election officials set a goal after the 2012 election to have 90 percent of the county registered. As of yesterday, officials met that goal.


Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Texas Tribune

Top Texas Republicans are condemning lewd comments Donald Trump made about women — but not backing off their support for their party's presidential nominee.

"These comments are disturbing and inappropriate, there is simply no excuse for them," tweeted U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, who recently endorsed Trump after a months-long holdout. "Every wife, mother, daughter — every person — deserves to be treated with dignity and respect." 

John Locher/AP

Last night, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton faced off in the second of three presidential debates ahead of Election Day on Nov. 8.

You can watch Sunday night's debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. here, courtesy of PBS Newshour. In addition, you can follow along with a transcript and annotated fact-checking below.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

Election officials in Texas are being accused of violating the Voting Rights Act, again.

This time it’s because dozens of county election administrators are not providing bilingual voter information on their websites, according to the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF).

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT News

It’s going to be easier for some populations to vote this year because of recent court-ordered changes to the voter ID law.  One group is the state’s homeless population, which typically faces many hurdles casting a ballot.

Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence squared off in the vice-presidential debate Tuesday night. You can watch a the entire debate courtesy PBS Newshour and follow along with NPR's fact check below. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

You've heard it all before. Texas is a red state. Democrats are hoping that shade of red will fade this November as voter registrations increase, but could more voters actually change the outcome? 


Pu Ying-Huang for KUT News

Over the next four months, Texas officials will be offloading programs aimed at helping newly arrived refugees. Last week, the state announced it was leaving the federal refugee resettlement program after four decades in the program.


Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

South by South Lawn, an imprint of the Austin-based festival kicks off today on the White House lawn. President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama both spoke at SXSW earlier this year. Today’s event is meant to encourage innovation via a festival of "art, ideas, and action."

We don't really know what Donald Trump paid in taxes, because unlike every other major presidential candidate in the last four decades, the GOP nominee has refused to release his tax returns. But the New York Times offers a tantalizing theory that Trump could have legally escaped income tax liability on hundreds of millions of dollars, thanks to staggering losses from two decades ago.

There's been a lot of fuss made about U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz’s recent decision to support Donald Trump for president after he famously refused to endorse him at the Republican National Convention this summer. But he's not the only Texas leader who’s expressed a change of heart.

Qiling Wang for KUT

In less than a month, the window for registering for this year’s presidential election will close. That’s why on Tuesday's National Voter Registration Day groups were helping folks all over the city get registered – and that includes people who are blind.


DREW ANGERER / GETTY IMAGES

Tonight's the night.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will meet tonight for the first of three long-awaited presidential debates. The Hofstra University-hosted debate starts at 8 p.m. CST live from Hempstead, N.Y.

Watch the YouTube live stream below courtesy of PBS Newshour. 

The 90-minute debate will be streamed commercial free and will be moderated by NBC's Lester Holt. 

Pu Ying Huang for KUT News

The way refugees are resettled in Texas could be in for a big shakeup.

Yesterday, state officials threatened to withdraw from the federal refugee resettlement program if the feds don’t approve the state’s plan, which has some controversial elements — including a cap on the number of refugees the state takes in and a stricter screening process for refugees.


Photo by Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

A federal judge sided again today with plaintiffs in the long legal battle over Texas' voter ID law.

This time, the U.S. Department of Justice joined the group of Texas voters challenging the state’s law, arguing Texas election officials were misleading voters about court-ordered changes to the law.

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