Politics

Political news

This week on the show: With the party conventions finally over, the Texas Tribune's Jay Root and KUT's Ben Philpott will dive into what the race looks likes as the campaigns really kick off. And what Donald Trump's very, very, VERY bad week could mean moving forward.

And as you've probably already seen, one of the biggest stories this week is the post-convention polls! We'll have UT Austin pollster Jim Henson guide us through all the big bounces in the last month.

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

Texas struck a deal Wednesday that will soften its voter ID law for the November general election — a development that lawyers suing the state say will make it easier for minorities to cast their ballots. 

The state reached the agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice and minority rights groups just a few weeks after a federal appeals court ruled that Texas’ 2011 voter identification law was discriminatory.


Democrats called on Americans to reject what they called the politics of fear and division of the GOP and elect Hillary Clinton during the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images

This week on The Ticket 2016:  KUT's Ben Philpott and the Texas Tribune's Jay Root check back in with Google Data Editor Simon Rogers on what kind of internet searches are being inspired from the speeches at the DNC in Philadelphia.

Then they'll check in with Tribune Reporter Patrick Svitek from inside the convention hall to see if the Bernie Bros really won't vote for Hillary Clinton.

Donald Trump urged Russian agents to "find" his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton's emails and release them, an unprecedented move by a candidate for president encouraging such a foreign breach.

"Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing," the GOP presidential nominee said at a news conference in Miami on Wednesday. "I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press."

The Tuesday night session of the Democratic convention was really three events, each with its own atmosphere and impact, but all contributing to a single theme: The Clintons are back.

The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

A contentious scene unraveled here Tuesday morning at a meeting of Texas delegates after one criticized Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee and a favorite of Lone Star State Democrats.

For Michelle Obama, this election is about the kids. On the opening night of the Democratic National Convention, the first lady wove her vision for the next generation with her hope for the next president.

"This election, and every election, is about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four or eight years of their lives," she said, adding that Hillary Clinton is the only candidate "who I trust with that responsibility."

Cheryl Gerber / Texas Tribune

Last week, a federal appeals court ruled Texas’ voter ID law makes it harder for minorities to vote. The state was told it could no longer enforce the law as is.

Early voting in the first election since that ruling is now underway, so that special election in Bexar County is following a new set of rules.


Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine is Hillary Clinton's choice for her vice president, giving her a running mate with experience at all levels of government to round out the Democratic ticket.

Clinton told supporters the news in a text message and a tweet on Friday evening just after 8 p.m. ET. According to a Clinton campaign official, the former secretary of state called Kaine this evening to make the formal offer.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

There was a little-noticed lawsuit filed in federal court this week.

Lawyers representing six Latino voters in Texas argue the way we elect judges for the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals and the Texas Supreme Court violates the Voting Rights Act because it denies Latino voters an equal opportunity to elect judges of their choice.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Austin is facing legal action over its rules governing short-term rentals, like those you’d find on sites like Airbnb and Homeaway. But some in the hospitality industry say those rentals should have to follow the same rules. The two sides sparred over the issue in a debate Thursday.


Painting a grim picture of America, Donald Trump promised to protect the country and restore "law and order" by putting "America First" in his address Thursday evening formally accepting the GOP nomination for president.

abby livingston / Texas Tribune

CLEVELAND — U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz faced a livid — and yet admiring — Texas delegation on the final day of the Republican National Convention, only 12 hours after Donald Trump loyalists in the convention booed the junior senator off the stage. 

In a standing room-only Texas GOP delegation breakfast Thursday morning, Cruz defended his refusal to endorse the GOP nominee Wednesday evening.

For all those who view the nominating conventions of the major parties as overly scripted, predictable and boring, Wednesday night's session of the Republican National Convention came as a jolt.

The third night of this extravaganza had all the usual hoopla — plus a blackout on the jumbo screens, delegates screaming at each other, and a major presidential candidate getting booed off the stage.

It was supposed to be Indiana Gov. Mike Pence's political coming-out party, but drama with Ted Cruz largely overshadowed his moment at the Republican National Convention.

The crowd quickly turned on Cruz on Wednesday night after he refused to endorse GOP nominee Donald Trump.

The Texas senator and Republican primary runner-up was initially met with a warm reception, holding the crowd in the palm of his hand as he told emotional stories about the recent police shootings in Dallas and how America had to defend the Constitution and the freedoms of speech and religion.

Justin Dehn / Texas Tribune

This week on The Ticket 2016, KUT's Ben Philpott talks with Google Data Editor Simon Rogers about some of the real-time reactions to the speakers at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. (Spoiler – searches for "Chachi Loves Trump" spiked Monday night.)

Cheryl Gerber and Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

Texas’ voter identification law violates the U.S. law prohibiting racial discrimination in elections, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. 

Abby Livingston / Texas Tribune

From the Texas TribuneCLEVELAND — U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan surprisingly drew some boos Tuesday morning during remarks to Texas Republicans —  but it was all in good fun. 

Ryan, the headline speaker at Tuesday's Texas delegation breakfast at the Republican National Convention, began with a mischievous bent. As he sought to discuss GOP unity, he enlisted a comparison with college football rivalries.

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