Politics

Political news

Screenshot via CNN

From the Texas Standard: The second GOP debate is one for the history books. Last night's primetime event had some standout moments – a few fireworks, perhaps. It also seemed to be somewhat of a contest in stamina, since the main event lasted three hours. Just in case you didn't make it all the way through Jennifer Mercieca, communications professor at Texas A&M, has got us covered.


Callie Richmond/Texas Tribune

This week on The Ticket: A live episode! Recorded Wednesday at the Google Fiber space in Austin just before the CNN Republican presidential debate.

Tonight, join KUT's Ben Philpott, the Texas Tribune's Jay Root, and special guest Jennifer Rubin of the Washington Post's Right Turn blog for a live recording of the weekly podcast The Ticket 2016: A look at presidential politics from a Texas perspectiv

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

Yesterday morning, we heard a story about the nation’s aging voting machines and the problems they could present in the future. But that same report, which warns of trouble ahead for some municipalities, also details how Travis County has developed a new voting system, set to premiere in time for 2018 elections.

GeorgePBush
Image via Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

George P. Bush has been taking an active role in his father's GOP campaign. But has it been negatively affecting his role as the General Land Commissioner?

Just over six months into his term as Texas Land Commissioner, George P. Bush has been hard at work ... campaigning for his dad.

Bush ran for his current position on a commitment to "reboot" the General Land Office. But he's drawn new headlines recently over how much time he hasn't been at work, despite active initiatives to institute a new management structure and return the agency to zero-based budgeting.

Brian M. Rosenthal, state bureau reporter for the Houston Chronicle, tells the Standard that based on the land commissioner's calendar, George P. Bush was off of work 23 out of the 50 days since his father Jeb Bush announced his run for president.

Updated at 7:00 p.m. ET.

Days before he was to be relegated once again to a second-tier debate, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry announced Friday he was suspending his struggling presidential campaign. It makes him the first to bow out in the crowded Republican presidential nominating contest.

Paxton Announces Legal Defense Team for Fraud Case

Sep 10, 2015
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: After spending more than two weeks without a lawyer, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has secured a defense team in the ongoing financial fraud case against him. 

Photo Courtesy The White House

This week on The Ticket: The Texas Tribune's Jay Root and KUT's Ben Philpott dive into the growing speculation that Vice President Joe Biden will run for the Democratic nomination. They'll talk with ABC News Digital Reporter Arlette Saenz, who's been covering the VP for several years. And even though running for President is a serious decision…they'll revisit some of Vice President Biden's most humorous moments.


Ben Philpott/KUT News

This week on The Ticket: The Tribune's Jay Root and KUT's Ben Philpott talk about one of the only GOP candidates that's been able to survive the Summer of Trump: Texas Senator Ted Cruz.

While Cruz's poll numbers have held steady, he's set himself up as an alternative to Trump, if, or when, the current GOP frontrunner flames out.


Marjorie Kamys Cotera for the Texas Tribune

A contempt hearing set for next week against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has been canceled.

Federal court Judge Orlando Garcia canceled the hearing, writing that Paxton and the other state officials— Governor Greg Abbott and interim Commissioner of the Texas State Department of Health and Human Services Kirk Cole — have complied with the court's Aug. 5 order to amend the death certificate of one member of a married same-sex couple and to issue state policy guidelines for recognizing legal same-sex marriages on birth and death certificates.

Todd Wiseman/Texas Tribune

Today, Sept. 1, marks the legal start for more than 600 new state laws for Texans to follow. From healthcare to transportation to education and public safety, there’s something that affects everyone in the Lone Star State.


Photo courtesy Andrew Magill, flickr.com/amagill

This week on The Ticket: The Tribune's Jay Root and KUT's Ben Philpott dive into the billions of dollars flowing through our campaign finance system. They’ll give a history of campaign finance to explain what lead to past regulations. And examine how the unchecked millions flowing through SuperPACs has affected the 2016 race for the White House.

Gage Skidmore https://flic.kr/p/e38G55

Did everyone pray in U.S. public schools prior to 1962 and was the Bible the principle textbook? Yes, according to Sen. Ted Cruz's father, Rafael Cruz, in an interview with the Austin American-Statesman. KUT's Nathan Bernier asks PolitiFact Texas reporter Gardner Selby what the Truth-O-Meter says

facebook screenshot/Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Don’t expect Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller to apologize over a social media post that appeared to call for the atomic bombing of “the Muslim world” – despite an outcry from critics.

Miller, who is currently on a trade mission to China, did not personally share a controversial photo that appeared on his campaign Facebook account and has since been removed, Todd Smith, the Republican's campaign spokesman, said Monday. The commissioner has no plans to figure out which of his staffers shared the controversial posting, or to apologize, Smith said.

“We’re not going to apologize for the posts that show up on our Facebook page,” said Smith, estimating that 18 people have access to the campaign account. “I don’t know who did it, but I’m not going to start a witch hunt to find out who did.” 

Ben Philpott/KUT News

This week on The Ticket: From Sioux City to Davenport, Mason City to Ottumwa and everyplace in between - this week it's all about Iowa! The Texas Tribune's Jay Root and KUT's Ben Philpott give you a taste of the state that holds so much power over how we pick a president — including asking the big question: Why Iowa?

We're also excited to announce a LIVE show and Debate-watching party September 16 at Google Fiber Space Austin. Details coming soon!

Bob Daemmerich/Texas Tribune

Rick Perry's presidential campaign has stopped paying all of its staff as the Republican former Texas governor's fundraising has dried up, campaign officials and other Republicans familiar with the operation said late Monday.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

In an emergency motion filed Monday in federal court in San Antonio, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton asked that the court rescind the order requiring the AG to appear in court Wednesday to face possible contempt charges for disobeying a ban on state same-sex marriage bans in a case involving a death certificate for a same-sex couple.

whiteafrican via flickr

The State of Texas has yet to file an appeal over a ruling against the state's voter identification law. Last week the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the law violated the Voting Rights Act.

But where do things stand now, and does the ruling mean Texans don't have to bring a photo ID when they vote this fall?

Marjorie Kamys Cotera for the Texas Tribune

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton may face contempt of court charges next week for his part in denying a married same-sex couple a death certificate acknowledging their marriage.

A lawsuit was filed against Paxton today in federal court in San Antonio by James Stone-Hoskins, on behalf of himself and his partner, John Allen Stone-Hoskins, who died in January. James wants the death certificate to note that he and John Allen were married — the couple wed in New Mexico in 2014 — but as of now it lists him as a 'significant other.'

Ruling Offers Texas Voter ID Critics Narrow Victory

Aug 5, 2015
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

From the Texas Tribune:

Texas’ four-year-old voter ID law violates the Voting Rights Act but is not a “poll tax” barred under the U.S. Constitution, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Pages