police

Thomas Hawk/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The saying, you’re only as good as your equipment, has serious implications for first responders. A faulty service weapon can mean the difference between life and death for police officers and those they protect, which makes what's happening in Houston all the more frightening.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT Austin

From Texas Standard:

Soon, the Department of Public Safety (DPS) will begin billing local police departments across Texas for any lab work done by the agency. The service used to be free but DPS is now charging in order to make up for budget cuts to its lab system made during the regular legislative session.

Tony Hisgett/Wikimedia Commons [CC BY 2.0]

From Texas Standard:

A new program helps first responders with work-related trauma avoid criminal prosecution if they commit a crime. House Bill 3391, which is now law, gives counties the option to set up specialty courts to divert people into treatment rather than jail.

Flickr/North Charleston (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It’s common practice for police officers to earn a couple of bucks on the side by working various off-duty gigs.

But for some moonlighting officers, one piece of equipment is often left behind. Most police agencies that require officers to wear body cameras don't require or won't allow cameras on off-duty officers.

 

From Texas Standard:

Five seconds and 50,000 volts – that's enough of a jolt to hijack your nervous system and contract every muscle in your body. Applying electricity in this way has become the tool of choice for police officers across the country. We're talking about conducted electrical weapons, better-known as tasers. They've rapidly moved from an obscure police technology, into the public consciousness. They've been hailed by law enforcement as a life-saving tool. But some critics say that's far from the case.

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