performance-enhancing drugs

Lance Armstrong will not cooperate with a United States Anti-Doping Agency probe into doping in the cycling world.

Bloomberg reports Armstrong missed a deadline set by USADA today. Armstrong's lawyer said he would not cooperate because the probe was too narrow.

Bloomberg adds:

Lance Armstrong says a “full blown, global” Truth and Reconciliation Commission is the only way for cycling to move past doping scandals.

In his first interview since admitting to doping, Armstrong says cyclists need to be assured that there won’t be consequences if they share the truth.

Daniel Benson is the Managing Editor at He told KUT that to get the interview with Armstrong—all he had to do was ask.

Reports that an Australian library is moving books by and about Lance Armstrong from non-fiction to fiction have proven false, much to the disappointment of those leaving comments on

USA Today, the UK’s Daily Mail and more recently tech-news site Mashable have all reported that Manly Library, a public library in Sydney, recatalogued Armstrong books following the cyclist’s confession to Oprah Winfrey last week. In an exclusive interview with the talk show host, Armstrong admitted to doping, lying and bullying.

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

The Lance Armstrong Bikeway opened in 2009. It was an example of the city's enthusiasm for cycling – which was, in part, prompted by Armstrong's success.

It's fair to say that, because of Armstrong's cycling achievements and active role in supporting those fighting cancer, Armstrong was a sort of icon in Austin.

But after Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Oprah Winfrey last night, the Austin community is starting to question if his influence in town is appropriate.

(Updated at 10:40 a.m. to include Livestrong Foundation's CEO comments on The Today Show.)

The Livestrong Foundation—the Austin-based non-profit that Lance Armstrong founded to help people battling cancer—has been a major part of the conversation in the fallout surrounding the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's report on Armstrong's doping. Now, it's also a player after Armstrong's confession.

The Livestrong Foundation released a statement following the first part of Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey.

The statement says employees are disappointed that Armstrong misled them during and after his cycling career. But it also says employees accept Armstrong’s apology from earlier this week and want to move on.

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Oprah Winfrey last night. For many Austinites, the much-anticipated confession was worth a special viewing appointment. And for some, it even called for a watch party.

A few dozen watch party attendees crowded around picnic tables on the patio and at the u-shaped wood bar at Little Woodrow’s on Sixth Street as they waited for the tell-all from the Texas native on his decade-long doping cover up.

(We updated the top of this post at 10:40 p.m. ET.)

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating on all his seven Tour de France victories.

In an interview with Oprah Winfrey, the second part of which airs Friday, Armstrong said he was never afraid of getting caught and attributed his actions to a "ruthless desire to win."

The Tour of France is celebrating the 100th edition of the race this year. Around 500 former riders who finished the race are invited for the occasion and are expected to be at the finish line on the Champs-Elysees.

But Lance Armstrong probably won't be there.

Due to the doping scandal, Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme told the Associated Press, it would be "out of place" to send Armstrong an invitation to the 2013 centenary celebration.

Has Lance Confessed?

Jan 15, 2013

The 'will he or won't he' may be answered before Oprah Winfrey's much-anticipated interview with the cyclist airs Jan. 17. The Associated Press is reporting that Lance Armstrong has confessed to Oprah about using performance-enhancing drugs.

The AP cites "a person familiar with the situation." The newsgathering organization says "the person spoke on condition of anonymity because the interview is to be broadcast Thursday on Winfrey's OWN network."

Armstrong has also reportedly apologized to the Livestrong Foundation staff—the Austin-based non-profit he started to support people fighting cancer.

Bobby Blanchard for KUT News

Before sitting down with an exclusive interview with Oprah Winfrey, Lance Armstrong reportedly apologized to the Livestrong staff today.

At least seven media trucks were parked outside of Armstrong’s house Monday morning, hoping to catch a glimpse of Oprah Winfrey. The talk-show host was expected to appear at Armstrong’s house sometime Monday for an exclusive interview with the former cycling champion. However, the Associated Press reported this afternoon that Armstrong was on his way to a hotel to tape the interview.

The International Cycling Union (UCI) says no one will be named a winner for the seven years that Lance Armstrong finished first in the Tour de France.

The governing body of cycling is also calling on Armstrong and others accused of using performance-enhancing drugs to return the prize money they were awarded.

The UCI also announced today it will undergo an external review to determine whether it did enough to ensure Armstrong wasn’t doping.

Daniel Bayer,

This morning the governing body of cycling—the International Cycling Union (UCI)—agreed to strip Lance Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles.

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) banned Armstrong from sanctioned competition for life and moved to take away his titles but it was up to the UCI to make the final call.

The Associated Press reports that Christian Prudhomme, director of the Tour de France, has previously stated that the Tour will recognize any decision on Armstrong by the UCI.  Prudhomme stated that should the UCI decide to strip Armstrong of his titles, the Tour's record books will show no winner from 1999-2005.

Cyclist Lance Armstrong is stepping down from his role as chairman of the cancer-awareness charity Livestrong, the organization said in a press release today. (Update at 8:34 a.m. Separately, Nike dropped its sponsorship of Armstrong.)

Reactions to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's recently released report on cyclist Lance Armstrong's use of performance-enhancing drugs have ranged from denial to anger and disappointment. Some have said Armstrong merely did what it took to compete with pro racers, all of them chemically enhanced. But that's just not true, says Joe Lindsey, a contributor to Bicycling magazine.

Daniel Bayer,

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has released 202-pages of a report it is sending  to other athletic and cycling governing bodies today, Wednesday, Oct. 10 about Lance Armstrong's alleged doping. The report details what USADA says it's uncovered about the Austin cyclist’s use of performance enhancing drugs.

Armstrong has denied doping but stopped his legal fight against the charges in August. The International Cycling Union (UCI) will make the ultimate decision whether Armstrong will be banned from competition and stripped of his seven Tour de France titles.

In a statement about the report, USADA CEO Travis Tygart says the US Postal Service Pro Cycling Team that Armstrong was a part of ran the “most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.”

Armstrong’s Doping Case in Court

Seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong is scheduled to have his case in an Austin federal court today.

Armstrong is fighting claims by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that he used performance enhancing drugs. The agency wants to ban Armstrong from competition for life and take away his titles.

Armstrong has denied doping and his lawyers are arguing the USADA doesn’t have the authority to bring the charges against him. They are asking a judge to issue an injunction to stop the case.

Photo courtesy of Flicker user Keith Allison:

Roger Clemens - the former UT-Austin, Boston Red Sox and New York Yankee star, is requesting a judge get rid of his indictment on charges of lying to Congress to prevent him from being tried twice.