performance-enhancing drugs

Lance Armstrong will not cooperate with a United States Anti-Doping Agency probe into doping in the cycling world.

Bloomberg reports Armstrong missed a deadline set by USADA today. Armstrong's lawyer said he would not cooperate because the probe was too narrow.

Bloomberg adds:

Lance Armstrong says a “full blown, global” Truth and Reconciliation Commission is the only way for cycling to move past doping scandals.

In his first interview since admitting to doping, Armstrong says cyclists need to be assured that there won’t be consequences if they share the truth.

Daniel Benson is the Managing Editor at Cyclingnews.com. He told KUT that to get the interview with Armstrong—all he had to do was ask.

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Reports that an Australian library is moving books by and about Lance Armstrong from non-fiction to fiction have proven false, much to the disappointment of those leaving comments on Amazon.com.

USA Today, the UK’s Daily Mail and more recently tech-news site Mashable have all reported that Manly Library, a public library in Sydney, recatalogued Armstrong books following the cyclist’s confession to Oprah Winfrey last week. In an exclusive interview with the talk show host, Armstrong admitted to doping, lying and bullying.

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

The Lance Armstrong Bikeway opened in 2009. It was an example of the city's enthusiasm for cycling – which was, in part, prompted by Armstrong's success.

It's fair to say that, because of Armstrong's cycling achievements and active role in supporting those fighting cancer, Armstrong was a sort of icon in Austin.

But after Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Oprah Winfrey last night, the Austin community is starting to question if his influence in town is appropriate.

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(Updated at 10:40 a.m. to include Livestrong Foundation's CEO comments on The Today Show.)

The Livestrong Foundation—the Austin-based non-profit that Lance Armstrong founded to help people battling cancer—has been a major part of the conversation in the fallout surrounding the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's report on Armstrong's doping. Now, it's also a player after Armstrong's confession.

The Livestrong Foundation released a statement following the first part of Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey.

The statement says employees are disappointed that Armstrong misled them during and after his cycling career. But it also says employees accept Armstrong’s apology from earlier this week and want to move on.

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