Penn State scandal

A Pennsylvania judge on Wednesday denied a motion by former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky for a new trial.

Sandusky was convicted of 45 counts of sexual abuse of minors back in October. He was sentenced to a minimum of 30 years in jail.

Michael Sisak of the The Citizens' Voice in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., reports on Twitter:

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett (R), says the NCAA badly overreached itself when it imposed punitive financial sanctions on Penn State over the handling of sexual predator and former Penn State assistant football coach, Jerry Sandusky. Corbett is filing a federal anti-trust lawsuit against the collegiate athletic association, saying it ignored its own disciplinary rules in its rush to castigate the Pennsylvania university.

The commission in charge of accrediting universities in the Mid-Atlantic region has warned Penn State that if it doesn't make changes in light of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal, it could lose its accreditation.

The Middle States Commission on Higher Education put the university "on warning," the AP reports, saying that it wants a report on how the university is complying with integrity standards.

The sanctions slapped on Penn State football in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal charter a new territory in punishment by the NCAA, a sports author said today.

"I think it is unprecedented in terms of taking away wins. That's a huge blow," says Ted Kluck, author of several books on sports, including Game Time: Inside College Football.

Saying that the punishment is "warranted by the conspiracy of silence" among Penn State University's top leadership that turned a blind eye to former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's sexual abuse of young boys, the NCAA just announced sanctions on the school that include:

-- A $60 million fine. The money will go into an endowment fund to support programs around the nation that assist victims of sexual abuse, NCAA President Mark Emmert said.

Photo by Erik Reyna for KUT News.

Veterans Day Closures, Parade

City of Austin offices are closed today in observance of Veterans Day. That includes City Hall, public libraries, and all recreation, cultural and senior centers. Garbage, recycling and yard trimmings will be picked up as usual.

The City of Austin and Travis County Veterans Day Parade will start at 9 a.m. at the Ann Richards Congress Avenue Bridge and will make its way up to the Capitol. 

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