NASA

NOAA Photo Library/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

A musician and a scientist fall in love and then move to the South Pole. It’s not the intro to a joke – it’s the story of Jennifer McCallum and John Bird, the authors and protagonists of a new book called “One Day, One Night: Portraits of the South Pole.”

Wendy Stenzel / NASA, Ames Research Center

Researchers have discovered a new planet in a distant solar system, bringing the total number in the system to eight – the same number as in our own solar system.

That's a first.  

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Austin may not be in best spot to see the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, but there will be a show, nonetheless.

The visible path of the total eclipse runs diagonally across the U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina — well to our north — but we’ll still see about 65 percent of the sun obscured by the moon at its peak.

The eclipse will begin in Austin at around 11:41 a.m., reach its maximum at about 1:10 p.m. and then be completely over by 2:39 p.m.

When a resupply rocket takes off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., today, viewers at home will be able to experience the launch like they were along for the ride.

That's because a special 360-degree camera has been installed at the base of the Atlas V rocket en route to the International Space Station.

On This week’s program, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr speaks with Margot Lee Shetterly, author of ‘Hidden Figures: The American Dream And The Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Help Win the Space Race.’

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