On My Block: 12th & Chicon

The area around 12th & Chicon streets is in the midst of a radical change that's been decades in the making. KUT is exploring what happens when a place becomes valuable to a new group of people.

For more, check out our website for the series or subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Google Play or the direct feed.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

In the neighborhood around 12th and Chicon streets in East Austin – a lot has changed – new homes, new businesses, new residents – but there are some things that have stayed the same.

As part of our On My Block series, KUT’s Lauren Hubbard brings us to Marshall’s Barbershop, a longtime fixture in the neighborhood that’s now one of the few black-owned businesses in the neighborhood.

Check out more stories in this project at our On My Block Tumblr

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

In the neighborhood around 12th and Chicon streets in East Austin, change seems to be the only constant. We've been bringing you the voices of people in that neighborhood over the past few months as part of our On My Block project. Today, we hear from Judy Mitchell, who owns the Ideal Soul Mart at the corner of Angelina Street and Rosewood Avenue.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

Bobby Mitchell walks across the parking lot on the corner of Rosewood Avenue and Angelina Street, pointing to the large, newly built homes across the street.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

L.M. Rivers stared at the several black tiles he had glued onto the canvas. They colored one-third of what was to be a baseball cap. But Rivers was not so sure what to make of the face depicted beneath the baseball cap.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Our story begins at a dead end near 13th Street and Walnut Avenue in the Chestnut neighborhood of East Austin, just down the street from where Leslie Padilla has lived for about three years. 

You wouldn’t know it from looking at it, but a vacant field just past this dead end is a piece of Austin’s African-American history. About a century ago, this land was home to the city’s annual Juneteenth celebration, which marks the end of slavery in Texas.

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