Mengwen Cao/KUT

A $50 million donation to the forthcoming Dell Medical Center at UT-Austin will establish the Livestrong Cancer Institutes.

The gift, which will be doled out over the next decade, has pushed the university over its fundraising goal to raise $3 billion over eight years and looks to provide a new model of care for cancer patients in Travis County and beyond.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

The Austin Marathon will be changing tracks next February, metaphorically speaking.

Freescale Semiconductor, a technology company based in Austin, announced this morning that it will sponsor the 2014 race, which takes place on Feb. 16. Livestrong has sponsored the race for the previous three years.

Update: Nike has produced merchandise with the Livestrong logo for nine years – raising more than $100 million for the foundation. But Nike will stop making the merchandise after this holiday season.

According to Livestrong Vice President of Communications & External Affairs Katherine McLane, Nike will stop production before the end of 2013 – that's before the contract ends in December 2014.

The Livestrong Foundation says it is bigger than its founder and it will survive past the scandal surrounding Lance Armstrong.

“I have to tell you that over the past months, I felt most indignant when our team’s credibility has been called into question as a result of something that had nothing to do with them," Andy Miller, the non-profit's vice president, said at the foundation's annual meeting today in Chicago.

Update: Omar Martinez, 27, was the overall winner at this year's Austin Marathon. He finished the 26.2 miles in just over 2 hours and 35 minutes. Kyle Smith, 26, was the fastest finisher from Austin. He came in 4th place overall.

Thirty-one year old Mariko Neveu of Austin took first place among the women. She finished in just over 2 hours and 55 minutes.

You can check your own, your friend's, or any other competitor's time at the Austin Marathon results page.

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

The Lance Armstrong Bikeway opened in 2009. It was an example of the city's enthusiasm for cycling – which was, in part, prompted by Armstrong's success.

It's fair to say that, because of Armstrong's cycling achievements and active role in supporting those fighting cancer, Armstrong was a sort of icon in Austin.

But after Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Oprah Winfrey last night, the Austin community is starting to question if his influence in town is appropriate.

(Updated at 10:40 a.m. to include Livestrong Foundation's CEO comments on The Today Show.)

The Livestrong Foundation—the Austin-based non-profit that Lance Armstrong founded to help people battling cancer—has been a major part of the conversation in the fallout surrounding the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's report on Armstrong's doping. Now, it's also a player after Armstrong's confession.

The Livestrong Foundation released a statement following the first part of Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey.

The statement says employees are disappointed that Armstrong misled them during and after his cycling career. But it also says employees accept Armstrong’s apology from earlier this week and want to move on.

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Oprah Winfrey last night. For many Austinites, the much-anticipated confession was worth a special viewing appointment. And for some, it even called for a watch party.

A few dozen watch party attendees crowded around picnic tables on the patio and at the u-shaped wood bar at Little Woodrow’s on Sixth Street as they waited for the tell-all from the Texas native on his decade-long doping cover up.

(We updated the top of this post at 10:40 p.m. ET.)

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating on all his seven Tour de France victories.

In an interview with Oprah Winfrey, the second part of which airs Friday, Armstrong said he was never afraid of getting caught and attributed his actions to a "ruthless desire to win."

The organization Lance Armstrong founded to help those battling cancer has dropped his name.

A media representative for the organization confirmed to KUT News that the Lance Armstrong Foundation is now officially the Livestrong Foundation—a name that many already knew it by.

Lance Armstrong has fully stepped down from Livestrong, the cancer-fighting charity he helped create.

Armstrong stepped down as Livestrong chairman in in mid-October. He apparently resigned from the board on Nov. 4, although news outlets didn’t catch up with that news until this weekend.

The Washington Post spoke with a Livestrong official. He told the Post the move was necessary to preserve Livestrong's viability:

In a statement, new board chairman Jeff Garvey said Armstrong resigned from the board to spare the organization any negative effects resulting from the controversy surrounding his cycling career.

The International Cycling Union (UCI) says no one will be named a winner for the seven years that Lance Armstrong finished first in the Tour de France.

The governing body of cycling is also calling on Armstrong and others accused of using performance-enhancing drugs to return the prize money they were awarded.

The UCI also announced today it will undergo an external review to determine whether it did enough to ensure Armstrong wasn’t doping.

Daniel Bayer,

This morning the governing body of cycling—the International Cycling Union (UCI)—agreed to strip Lance Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles.

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) banned Armstrong from sanctioned competition for life and moved to take away his titles but it was up to the UCI to make the final call.

The Associated Press reports that Christian Prudhomme, director of the Tour de France, has previously stated that the Tour will recognize any decision on Armstrong by the UCI.  Prudhomme stated that should the UCI decide to strip Armstrong of his titles, the Tour's record books will show no winner from 1999-2005.

Cyclist Lance Armstrong is stepping down from his role as chairman of the cancer-awareness charity Livestrong, the organization said in a press release today. (Update at 8:34 a.m. Separately, Nike dropped its sponsorship of Armstrong.)