Life & Arts

Entertainment, live performance, food, cuisine, dining, theater, film, television, art, broadcasting, SXSW, and other arts and culture news in and around Austin and the Central Texas counties of Travis, Hays, Caldwell, Bastrop and Williamson

Jessica Attie

Host poet and novelist Carrie Fountain talks with poet Tarfia Faizullah about how the loss of her sister in a car accident influenced her poem "West Texas Nocturne."

Domingo Farias

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Elijah Watson, news editor for the New York-based black culture website Okayplayer. The word "woke," is an African-American colloquialism that is now defined as "aware of and actively attentive to important facts and issues."

Watson talks about William Melvin Kelley, the man who coined the word "woke," how the word came about and why he took on this project.

Ones To Watch: Mélat

Mar 5, 2018
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUTX

All this week, KUTX will profile the Ones To Watch: seven must-see artists at SXSW 2018. 

Mélat is an Austin-based artist who’s influenced by a little bit of everything: Ella Fitzgerald, Mariah Carey, even the Ethiopian music she heard around the house growing up. It makes for an interesting mix on her latest album Move Me II: The Present.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Austin this January, and we’re bringing you some of the stories that were recorded there. Locally recorded stories will air Monday and Wednesday mornings during Morning Edition and archived here.  

Lucille Harrell recently sat down in the StoryCorps mobile booth with Joni Rogers, a longtime family friend. Joni asked Lucille, who is 93, to talk a little about  growing up in Victoria, Texas during the Depression.

"It was started a few years back, and it's basically highlighting the history of Indians in America and their immigrant journey over to the United States," says Pooja Sethi of the Smithsonian exhibition Beyond Bollywood.

"I actually went a few years ago, when I was at my husband's cousin's wedding," she continues. "And I came out really emotional, because ... it was our history for the very first time. And I realized that Indian-American is a whole separate culture. I mean, you have India and you have America, but this is the first time that an exhibit actually told me that I'm a culture."

Pages