Life & Arts

In Black America Podcast
7:52 am
Mon March 3, 2014

SRB Communications: Growing a Successful Media Company [Part II]

Sheila Brooks, Founder, President and CEO

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Sheila Brooks, founder, president and CEO 
of SRB Communications. Brooks is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, entrepreneur and dedicated advocate for minority and women’s issues and small businesses.

SRB Communications is a full-service strategic communications agency and post-production facility located Washington, D.C. The company helps clients develop their brand, positioning and strategies in creative campaigns through integrated media formats in broadcast, print and multimedia. Brooks is an expert in entrepreneurial education and minority business issues. 

Read more
Arts Eclectic
2:26 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

See 'The Whale' at Hyde Park Theatre

The tragicomedy The Whale won plenty of awards following its world premier in Denver in 2012. The play, by Samuel D. Hunter, centers around Charlie, who has been steadily eating himself into an early grave since the death of his boyfriend years earlier. Now close to 600 pounds and unwilling to seek medical help, Charlie looks for reconciliation with his long-lost daughter Ellie and understanding from his only friend, Liz.

It's a departure of sorts for  A Chick and A Dude, who are known for heavily-male casts, often featuring hitmen or other testosterone-heavy character types. This time out, director Melissa Livingston-Weaver actually has a cast with more women than men, which she admits makes a nice change of pace.

Read more
Life & Arts
7:05 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Prodigies or Not: Menuhin Competition Inspires Young Austin Musicians

Parent Daniella Sideh says she finds music is a place where she can bond with her children and understand how they learn.
Laura Rice, KUT News

The best young violin players in the world are in Austin right now for the Menuhin Competition. It’s the first time the prestigious contest featuring players under 22 years old has been held in North America.

UT’s Butler School of Music is hosting the 10-day competition. And it’s a rare opportunity for aspiring young string players in the area to see what’s possible with a lot of hard work.

“It’s considered the Olympics of the violin. It’s also called the F1 of the violin," Butler School of Music Interim Director Glenn Richter says. “We’re getting an international and a national exposure and flair that is very special for Austin.”

Read more
Arts Eclectic
8:34 am
Wed February 26, 2014

See 'Charley's Aunt' in the Hill Country

The British farce Charley’s Aunt is currently onstage at Wimberley Playhouse. Originally performed in Suffolk, England in 1892, the play is a classic comedy, with mistaken identities, men in drag, and the sort of fast-paced action you expect from a good farce. 

By far the most enduring work by playwright Brandon Thomas, Charley's Aunt quickly became a classic, enjoying countless productions worldwide in the 122 since its birth. 

Read more
in Black America Podcast
9:14 am
Mon February 24, 2014

SRB Communications: Growing a Successful Media Company

Sheila Brooks, Founder, President and CEO

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Sheila Brooks, founder, president and CEO 
of SRB Communications. Brooks is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, entrepreneur and dedicated advocate for minority and women’s issues and small businesses.

SRB Communications is a full-service strategic communications agency and post-production facility located Washington, D.C. The company helps clients develop their brand, positioning and strategies in creative campaigns through integrated media formats in broadcast, print and multimedia. Brooks is an expert in entrepreneurial education and minority business issues. 

Read more
Arts Eclectic
1:27 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

The Menuhin Competition Comes to Austin

The Menuhin International Competition for Young Violinists is kind of a big deal. It's been called "the Olympics of violin," which is apt, as it's a worldwide competition that brings together the best young talent in its field.

The biennial event was founded by famed violinist Yehudi Menuhin in 1983, and in the three decades since,  it’s been held all over the world but never before in America. That changes this week, however, as the 2014 Menuhin Competition gets underway right here in Austin, hosted by UT’s Butler School of Music.

Read more
Arts Eclectic
9:19 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Jaston Williams Asks, 'Is There Life After Lubbock?'

Believe it or not, musicians Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Joe Ely, Jo Carol Pierce, and Kimmie Rhodes are all from the same Texas town, Lubbock. And actor and storyteller Jaston Williams, while not born in Lubbock, spent much of his formative years there, and still visits often. As he says, "I've got Lubbock in the blood. We've tried to do something about it, but once you've got it, you've got it."

That shared connection is the basis of the new show "Is There Life After Lubbock?", a free-form, loosely structured evening of humor, stories, and music taking the stage of the Stateside at the Paramount Theater this weekend. 

Read more
Arts Eclectic
11:40 am
Tue February 18, 2014

'Lewd Asian Women' Take Over Salvage Vanguard Theater

L.A.W. Lewd Asian Women, a new play from Lucky Chaos Theater Projects, opens on Febuary 28 at Salvage Vangaurd Theater. It's written and performed by Christine Hoang, Alice Liu Cook, Lilan Ren, and Leng Wong, who, with the exception of Wong, are all working lawyers in our community.

It’s based in part on the lives of Wong, Cook, and Hoang, three Asian women living in Austin today (Ren portrays the Voice of the Law), and inspired by an 1875 court case involving 22 Chinese immigrants. That case, Chy Lung v Freeman, began when 22 Chinese women were barred from entering San Francisco harbor after being declared "lewd and debauched" by the California commissioner of immigration. The evidence for their lewdness included the fact that they traveled without husbands or children and their flowery garments.

Read more
In Black America Podcast
5:13 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Four Who Made A Difference

Marsha Coleman-Adebayo

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the Dr.

Read more
Life & Arts
2:28 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

South Lamar Alamo Drafthouse Gets New Opening Date

The South Lamar Drafthouse could open as soon as this summer.
Afsheen Nomai

The Alamo Drafthouse announced today its delayed South Lamar location will open sometime this summer. The theater was closed in January of last year for major renovations, while the strip mall around it was demolished to make way for a new mixed-use development. 

The theater was initially slated to open in September of last year, but by October only the parking garage foundation had been completed. And even this new opening date isn't very specific.

Read more
Arts Eclectic
10:23 am
Tue February 11, 2014

'Little Red Chunari' is a New Take on a Classic Tale

Little Red Chunari is a new play from Scottish Rite Community and Children’s Theater. It’s a family friendly Bollywood-style adaptation of the classic tale “Little Red Riding Hood,” written by Prentice Riddle and Susan Gayle Todd.

The story originated years ago, when Riddle was in the habit of telling his children (who are of Indian descent) stories to pass the time on car trips. He'd usually pick an existing story and change it up a little to give it more of an Indian flavor; that's why Little Red wears a chunari (a multi-purpose scarf worn in much of South Asia) rather than a riding hood.

Read more
Arts Eclectic
1:40 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Marc Pouhé Returns to the Stage as Othello

Sara Cormier and Marc Pouhé in 'Othello'

Othello is the latest production by Austin Shakespeare. This version of the classic play is directed by artistic director Ann Ciccolella and stars veteran actor Marc Pouhé in the title role.

It's Pouhé's second time playing Othello in an Austin Shakespeare production. He first played the role in 2005; since then, he's gone through some life changes, not the least of which was a battle with kidney failure. He's healthy now, but the illness kept him off the stage for a few years. Now ready to continue his acting career, Pouhé is playing Othello again, a little older and with a different outlook on life.

Read more
In Black America Podcast
2:47 pm
Sun February 9, 2014

Roots: The Saga of an American Family

Alex Haley

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Alexander Murray Palmer Haley. Haley’s quest to learn more about his family history resulted in his writing the Pulitzer Prize-winning book "Roots: The Sage of an American Family."

The book has been published in 37 languages, and was made into the first week-long television miniseries, viewed by an estimated 130 million people. "Roots" also generated widespread interest in genealogy.

Read more
SXSW
5:28 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Too Many SXSW Events? City Stops Accepting Permit Applications Before Deadline

A SXSW event in 2013.
Filipa Rodrigues, KUT News

For the first time ever, the City has stopped accepting permit applications for the week of South by Southwest before the actual application deadline.

The application cut-off announced this morning applies to all temporary use, temporary change of use, and music permits. 

Multi-day permit applications have a deadline of one month before the event, so the city’s early cut-off only shortened that application window by one day.

Read more
Author Interviews
11:57 am
Tue February 4, 2014

Best-Selling Author Jen Lancaster Kicks Off 'Twisted' Book Tour in Austin

"I’ve always written characters, protagonists who are more likely to explode," Jen Lancaster says. In her new book "Twisted Sisters," "the character Reagan is someone who is imploding."
Jeremy Lawson for Penguin Books

I caught up with Jen Lancaster as she was heading to the airport. In the background, her dogs were barking a welcome to the guy who cleans up their “messes” from the back yard. “The best 11 dollars I ever spent in my life,” Lancaster says. “I don’t know what he does with it but that is not my concern [though]; I hope it’s going to a farmer somewhere to be used as fertilizer.”

In her new novel, “Twisted Sisters,”  Jen Lancaster has written a story of sibling rivalry run amok. A story of three sisters – one of which is deeply unhappy in her life but doesn’t realize it – and who transforms her relationships with her sisters in a highly unorthodox way.

Read more

Pages