Life & Arts

Entertainment, live performance, food, cuisine, dining, theater, film, television, art, broadcasting, SXSW, and other arts and culture news in and around Austin and the Central Texas counties of Travis, Hays, Caldwell, Bastrop and Williamson

Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman

What used to be a printing building on South Lamar has been converted to a glitzy new restaurant-bar called Eberly. Does the food live up to the decor? We ask Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam about his review.


From AGE of Cental Texas, this month's Get Involved spotlight non-profit:  

Mission:

AGE of Central Texas tackles the challenges of aging with expert solutions, and is dedicated to senior adult and family caregivers to help make aging a journey of compassion and strength.

Who We Are:

BBC / The Andrew Marr Show

Academy Award-winner and sometime-Austinite Matthew McConaughey has waded into political commentary, of sorts. While appearing on the BBC’s "Andrew Marr Show" to promote his new movie “Gold,” the actor was asked if left-leaning Hollywood stars should give Donald Trump a break.

"It's pretty layered," Caroline Reck says of Glass Half Full Theatre Company's take on Don Quixote. "We traditionally do puppets, often mixing them with human performers, and that's definitely the case this time." The idea behind Don Quixote de La Redo isn't as simple as just adding puppets to the classic Cervantes tale, though. 

Library of Congress and Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin

Documents tell us how much people were sold for during our country's history of slavery. But a new book goes further, looking at how people who were enslaved were valued throughout their entire lives.

Ricardo B. Brazziell/Austin American-Statesman

The chef behind three Jack Allen's Kitchen locations in the Austin-area has a new restaurant, and the focus is seafood. We spoke to Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam about his review


Since 2008, UT's Landmarks public art program has brought dozens of works of art to the University of Texas, turning the campus into a 433 acre art gallery. The latest of those works is O N E E V E R Y O N E, created for the Dell Medical School by multimedia artist Ann Hamilton.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks the Honorable Robert L. Wilkins, United States District Judge for the District of Columbia, and author of ‘Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100 Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture.’

Updated 10:57 a.m.

Updated 9:53 a.m.

Updated 9:25 a.m.

When the nominees for the 2017 Academy Awards were announced this morning, La La Land racked up 14 nods, tying records held by Titanic and All About Eve.

Courtesy of Julia Robinson

If the consensus from November’s elections was that the media is more disconnected from everyday Americans than anyone recognized, at least one branch of Austin’s media producers is pushing back: photographers.

U.S. NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents a tribute to the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

During the less than 13 years of King’s leadership of the civil rights movement, from December 1955 until April 4, 1968, African-Americans achieved more genuine progress toward racial equality in America than the previous 350 years had produced. King is widely regarded as America’s preeminent advocate of nonviolence and one of the greatest nonviolent leaders in world history.

Tomoko Bason

Right after the election, there were demonstrations in Austin and around the country against Donald Trump’s win. The protests died down, but some groups felt like their work was just starting -- and they’re not necessarily groups that would call themselves “political.” 

It's that time of year again. NPR Music has put out the call for your best desk-bound musical stylings for its third annual Tiny Desk Contest. 

The rules are simple: Record a video behind a desk of your choosing, upload the video to YouTube and then fill out this form on the contest's website. Entrants must be at least 21 and undiscovered – you can't be signed to a record label. 

Every year, a promising artist (or two) is awarded the Umlauf Prize, and their work is displayed at the Umlauf Sculpture Garden. This year, the Umlauf is displaying not just the current prize-winning artwork, but a retrospective of several past prize-winners.

On Saturday, January 14, the sculpture garden will host an Insights artist talk with several Umlauf winners, including this year's winning artist, Elizabeth McClellan.

Pete Smith / Courtesy Harry Ransom Center

The archives from the hit cable series "Mad Men" is headed to UT-Austin's Harry Ransom Center.

The collection includes script drafts, props, costumes and video used in the production of the show. The donation was made by the series' creator and executive producer, Matthew Weiner, and the show's production company, Lionsgate.  

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Ruth Brown, the original queen of rhythm and blues.

Brown’s career took her from the Apollo theatre to Broadway. She was the most prolific African American female R&B vocalist of the '50's, surpassing Dinah Washington for a time.

NPR's YouTube channel, Skunk Bear, answers your science questions. This week, we picked one in honor of David Bowie.

Austin History Center, PICA 18419

“They were very concerned that it would affect the chickens and they wouldn't know when to lay the egg.”

What could shake up things so much that chickens in Austin wouldn't know the right time to do their thing? That recollection from a newspaper article can be heard in a documentary called The Last of the Moonlight Towers, which illuminates (get it?) the history of those iconic towers. Seventeen of the 31 original towers built around Austin are still standing. And though Austin wasn't the first city in the country to get moonlight towers when they went up in the 1890s, Austin is the last city that still has functioning towers.

"This is the most ambitious production I've ever done," says Justin Sherburn of his new multimedia project The Time Machine. "It's definitely combining music and theater in a way that's new for me," he says, adding "the shows I've done in the past have been mostly music oriented with slight multimedia, [but] this is a full-on multimedia experience."

The show grew out of Sherburn's longstanding fascination with synthesizers. "I just always thought it'd be fun to... basically use a time machine as a theme to explore sythesizers.

In the sci-fi themed show, Sherburn and his band will journey through the 20th century, starting in Austin and moving through the decades and across the planet. Visual designer Stephen Fishman will manipulate an animation sequence live during the show, projecting images onto and around the band. "It makes it look like the band is actually immersed in this machine," Fishman says.

Michael T. Carter http://www.mtcphotography.com/blog

We get live music recommendations from KUTX program director Matt Reilly.


Pages