Life & Arts

Entertainment, live performance, food, cuisine, dining, theater, film, television, art, broadcasting, SXSW, and other arts and culture news in and around Austin and the Central Texas counties of Travis, Hays, Caldwell, Bastrop and Williamson

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

A new series at the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center will use food to create connections with the history showcased in the museum and the contributions of African and African-Americans to food around the world.

Austin chef and writer Angela Shelf Medearis kicks off the “Eat Your Way Through History: Lunch and Learn” events Monday with an African, Caribbean and Texan menu. She’s hoping people from all over Austin will come to learn some history and about each other.

"We threw a party ... where we had our friends come, dressed as fake wrestlers, and sort of wrestle in my living room," says director and co-founder Chris Monica, describing the humble origins of Party World Rasslin'. "It was really fun, and so we decided we'd do it again in a few months with like more planning."

From there, Monica and his friends moved onto a homemade backyard wrestling ring. "It was really dangerous and really fun," he says. "Afterwards, we were like 'That was a great thing we did. Let's be sure to never do that again."

But friends and friends-of-friends demanded more, and Party World Rasslin' was born. The backyard bouts continued, with crowds getting bigger and bigger. "For the first year, every show we had was doubling in attendance," Monica notes.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

The Contemporary Austin has been making headlines lately – first with the installation of two sculptures by Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, then with news that it will transfer its indoor art collection to the Blanton Museum.

It turns out, this is all part of a larger project meant to turn Austin into a "museum without walls."

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Joyce F.  King, broadcaster, columnist, and author of ‘Exonerated: A Brief and Dangerous Freedom.’

"We're all about walking the tightrope where it might go horribly wrong," says the Institution Theater's Asaf Ronen. "And I think people kind of appreciate that about what we do."

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