Life & Arts

Turkey Time
4:10 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Should You Stuff Your Turkey For Thanksgiving?

flickr.com/tuchodi

As Thanksgiving nears, attention turns to the kitchen. And as families across the country prepare their family meals for Thursday, a debate: whether to stuff the bird.

Field & Feast is a weekly feature airing Saturdays on KUT and KUTX. On the Field & Feast website, Cecilia Nasti wades into the stuffing debate and offers the following advice on how to avert dressing disasters and other Thanksgiving goofs.

What’s turkey without stuffing? That wonderful bready filling, saturated with the savory juices of your holiday bird is heaven – that is, until it makes someone sick. 

The challenges of cooking a stuffed bird is getting the stuffing to reach the food safe temperature of the cooked turkey: 165° F.

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Arts Eclectic
2:36 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

See 'Steel Magnolias' at City Theatre

The play "Steel Magnolias" has been enduringly popular since its Off-Broadway debut in 1987. The comedy-drama features a cast of six women, and one set, the Southern beauty parlor in which the women congregate, gossip, argue, and laugh over the course of several years.

Artistic director Andy Berkovsky chose "Steel Magnolias" as City Theatre's holiday production because of its themes of family and togetherness.

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In Black America Podcast
2:14 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

Unbought and Unbossed: Shirley A. Chisholm

The Honorable Shirley A, Chisholm
wblsblackshistory.com

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents an encore presentation of a conversation he had with the late Shirley A. Chisholm.

Chisholm was the first African-American woman elected to Congress and an outspoken advocate for women and minorities during her seven terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. She was known as a politician who refused to allow fellow politicians, including the male-dominated Congressional Black Caucus, to sway her from her goals.

Born Shirley Anita St. Hill on November 30, 1924, in Brooklyn, New York. She was the eldest of four girls. Chisholm and her sisters spent much of their early childhood with their maternal grandmother in Barbados.

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JFK Assassination: 50 Years Later
8:28 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Interview: The Political Climate in Dallas Leading to JFK’s Assassination

Twelve Books

Walter Cronkite’s announcement of JFK’s assassination. The televised shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald. The Zapruder film. The Warren Commission.

In that avalanche of history, a new book suggests we’ve lost sight of something important: specifically, the seedbed for the most momentous political tragedy of 20th century America.

It’s the story of "Dallas, 1963." That’s the title of a new book by Stephen L. Davis and Bill Minutaglio.

Minutaglio talks with KUT’s David Brown about why he describes the book as a “biography of a city,” and what lessons may have been overlooked by history.  

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Arts Eclectic
1:28 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Geek Out at Wizard World Austin Comic Con

This weekend's Wizard World Austin Comic Con will be a three-day celebration of comic books, science fiction, and pop culture in general. There will be panel discussions, Q&As with artists, actors, and writers, and special appearances by myriad celebrities, including Stan Lee, William Shatner, cast members of Firefly and The Walking Dead, and many, many more.

The con will also feature several local artists, who will display and sell their artworks. Cartoonist Will Rodriguez, of the online and self-published comic Mangled Stare, will be there, pen in hand, sketching convention goers and displaying his wares.

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Arts Eclectic
9:21 am
Mon November 18, 2013

See a Classic American Comedy at the Vortex

The classic comedy Arsenic and Old Lace opens November 22 at the Vortex. The play, by Joseph Kesselring, centers around the Brewster family, which is eccentric to say the least. The clan includes Teddy, who believes he's Theodore Roosevelt and is digging the Panama Canal in the basement; Jonathan, who failed as a doctor but found success as a murderous mafioso; and Martha and Abby, the sweet, elderly aunts who have recently started murdering lonely old men. As the relatively calm center, third brother Mortimer tries keep things together.

The play was written in 1939 and is probably best remembered for its 1941 film version. The version which will open at the Vortex this week is produced by Different Stages, under the direction of Norman Blumensaadt. It stars Jennifer Underwood and Karen Jambon as the Brewster sisters, Tyler Jones at Mortimer, Michael Harlan as Teddy, and Steven Fay as Jonathan.

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In Black America Podcast
11:58 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Interview: How is Racial Profiling Reported?

Dr. Carol Archbold, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
North Dakota State University

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Carol A. Archbold, Associate Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Political Science at North Dakota State University and author of a study entitled “ Newspaper Accounts of Racial Profiling: Accurate Portrayal or Perpetuation of Myth?”

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Life & Arts
6:32 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Interview: Austin Teen Poet Shares His Award-Winning Words

Louis Lafair, 18, is one of just five National Student Poets.
Laura Rice, KUT News

Poetry. To some, it may seem like a method of expression reserved for Valentine’s Day. But at least one Austin high schooler isn’t rolling his eyes about it.

Louis Lafair is a 2013 National Student Poet. The St. Stephen’s Episcopal School senior was honored for his work along with just four other teens from across the country. He'll now serve as a literary ambassador for the southwest region for the next year.

The award is presented by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers. Lafair met First Lady Michelle Obama at the awards ceremony in Washington, D.C.

Lafair talked with KUT's Laura Rice about the honor:

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MUSIC
6:02 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Antone’s Nightclub Sold, Moving Back Downtown

The Psychedelic Furs perform at Antone's on July 18, 2013
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUTX

Antone’s has new owners. The Austin blues venue that was a launching pad for Stevie Ray Vaughan left downtown for East Riverside Drive earlier this year. 

“Antone’s has been such an integral part of Austin’s music history and we’re just happy to be carrying the torch to the next level,” said Tayloe Emery, one of the investors.  

He says the goal is to move Antone’s back into downtown Austin and the hope is to have that done in time for South by Southwest in March.

Founder Clifford Antone’s sister Susan Antone will stay on as part of the club's operations. 

Views and Brews
1:04 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

All About The Groove

Nov. 18 marked the 14th anniversary of Doug Sahm's passing. And KUT marked the day with a special look back on the life and legacy of Doug Sahm at a Views and Brews.

Listen back as KUTX’s Jody Denberg hosts, author and historian Joe Nick Patoski and musical guests Marcia Ball, Speedy Sparks and Ernie Durawa  for a night of stories and music from the life of Doug Sahm.

Arts Eclectic
12:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

See 'Murder Ballad Murder Mystery' in a Bar Near You

"Murder Ballad Murder Mystery" began its life several years ago, as a site specific work at the Vortex Theater.

Since then, its creative team decided to form their own production company. And the play's been condensed and made a little more travel-friendly.

The show (as the title implies), is a murder mystery inspired by murder ballads. It will soon hit the road, to be staged in several bars in Austin, as well as stopping at New Orleans and Marfa, Texas.

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Veterans Day
4:02 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

PHOTOS: Austin's Veterans Day Parade

Tony Martinez (left) is a Vietnam veteran. Matt Rayson (right) served in the 82 Airborne.
Matthew Alvarez for KUT News

Austinites took to Congress Avenue today for the city’s annual Veterans Day Parade.

While residents stood and cheered, participants marched their way to the steps of the Texas Capitol for a ceremony honoring veterans lost over the years.

Standing out within the crowd was Peace Washington Costanzo, dressed as Lady Liberty. Costanzo says she’s been dressing in this outfit for the past two years, and feels the outfit was fitting for today’s parade.

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Arts Eclectic
3:27 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Covering Shakespeare and 'Fixing King John'

After listening to the White Stripes' recording of Robert Johnson's "Stop Breaking Down," playwright Kirk Lynn was inspired to try a cover version of his own.

He decided to take on a Shakespeare play. But, reluctant to tamper with one of the greats, he opted to create his own version of what he considered Shakespeare's worst play, "King John."

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In Black America Podcast
5:01 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Harvard Law's Randall Kennedy on Race, Affirmative Action and The Law

Randall Kennedy, the Michael R. Klein Professor of Law at Harvard Law School

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Randall Kennedy, the Michael R. Klein Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and author of "For Discrimination: Race, Affirmative Action and the Law."

Affirmative action is perhaps one of the most divisive policies in this country. In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision regarding Fisher vs. University of Texas , affirmative action is once again making headlines. 

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Author Interviews
4:35 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

The Lair: The Story Behind the Story of the Teen Vampire Series

Emily McKay is the author of "The Lair," the sequel to "The Farm."
Emily Donahue, KUT News

Imagine a book about the future – a future where children are groomed to feed wild vampire-like beasts. A book with good guys who are bad guys, bad guys who retain a touch of humanity, and a few characters primed to save the world.

The Lair” is the second in a series of young adult books from Round Rock author Emily McKay. The first was “The Farm.”  Both are set in a post-apocalyptic future, in which adults have failed young people, and young people have adulthood thrust upon them.

McKay's vampires are neither glamorous nor elegant, but they are smarter, stronger and faster than humans. And in both “The Farm” and “The Lair,” human children are farmed to feed human/vampire Ticks.

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Food
3:03 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Truck By Truckwest Highlights Austin's Mobile Food Movement

Korean/Mexican fusion food vendor Chi'Lantro is one of the participants in Truck by Truckwest.
flickr.com/atmtx

Update: And the results are in. Truck By Truckwest, Austin’s first ever food truck taste-off, has a winner. 

After 1,400 votes were cast, Texas-inspired sandwich joint Hey! … You Gonna Eat or What? and chef/owner Eric Regan took home a $10,000 prize. Over 60 food trucks, showcasing a wide array of culinary creations, took part in the five-day event.

Austin Food for Life founder Brian Stubbs will also be presented a check for $3,100. Ten percent of the event’s proceeds were donated to the nonprofit, which helps Austin’s food and beverage service community access health care.

Original story (Oct. 31): It seems like you find them on almost every street in Austin: Airstreams, buses and trailers surrounded by chairs and picnic tables – a movable feast tucked away in whatever alleyway, vacant lot or convenience store that can hold them.

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Get Involved
8:44 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Get Involved Spotlight: Center for Child Protection

Learn more about the Center for Child Protection

The Center for Child Protection, a nationally accredited children’s advocacy center, is the first stop for children in Travis County who are suspected victims of sexual abuse, serious physical abuse and for children who have witnessed a violent crime. The Center is a child-friendly, specially-equipped facility where children go for recorded forensic interviews, medical exams, counseling and intervention during the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases. 

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In Black America Podcast
4:44 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Media CEO Paula Madison on Diversity in Television – Part II

Paula Williams Madison, Chairman and CEO Madison Media Management

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents his second, and final, discussion with Paula Williams Madison, Chairman and CEO of Madison Media Management LLC and Williams Group Holding LLC, a Chicago-based, family-owned company, which has significant investment in media – The African Channel.  Madison has moved from award-winning journalist to history-making top executive at NBCUniversal.

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Energy
2:45 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

How Zombie Movies Reflect Our Fears on Energy and the Environment

facebook.com/WorldWarZMovie

Let’s talk zombies. Can’t kill them. Can’t eat them. What are we to the living dead? 

No longer merely the province of Halloween season, nowadays zombies proliferate in American pop culture, from books to TV to film.

Dr. Michael Webber, deputy director of UT’s Energy Institute, says there’s good reason for the persistence of zombies – and it has a lot to do with how we think about power. 

Energy – or the lack thereof – is always a sign of post-apocalyptic and zombie culture. Loss of energy inevitably leads to resource wars among the apocalypse’s survivors. From “The Walking Dead” to “World War Z,” the main drive is often for fuel, water, or power.

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Arts Eclectic
1:33 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Cinema Touching Disability Film Festival Offers Entertainment and Education

Arts Eclectic feature on the Cinema Touching Disability Film Festival

The Cinema Touching Disability Film Festival will celebrate its 10th anniversary this weekend. The festival specializes in "disabilty films," which festival coordinator William Greer defines as a film about, starring, or made by a person with a disabilty.

This year, the festival will be headlined by two feature documentaries, "The Crash Reel" and "Getting Up: The Temp One Story." "The Crash Reel" focuses on aspiring Olympic snowboarder Kevin Pearce and his attempts to return to competitive snowboarding after suffering a traumatic brain injury. "Getting Up: The Temp One" Story documents grafiti artist Tempt-One as he learns a new way to practice his art after being paralyzed by the degenerative nerve disorder ALS.

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