Life & Arts

Arts Eclectic
3:28 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

Delve into 'The Strange Case of Edward Hyde and Dr. Jekyll'

Just in time for Halloween, Trouble Puppet Theater Company will unveil The Strange Case of Edward Hyde and Dr. Jekyll. It's of course inspired by the classic horror tale by Robert Louis Stevenson, but it's not at all a straight adaptation.

For Trouble Puppet founder Connor Hopkins, finding a way to put an original spin on well-known stories is a welcome challenge. In the case of 'Jekyll and Hyde,' Hopkins and his team found a way to take a tale with a very well-known twist and make the story surprising and unexpected.

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In Black America Podcast
12:59 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

In Black America Podcast: Fighting HIV/AIDS In The African American Community

Dr. Donna Hubbard McCree, Ph.D

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Donna Hubbard McCree, Associate Director for Health Equity, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Texas Book Festival
10:33 am
Sat October 25, 2014

'Station Eleven' Author Emily St. John Mandel Tackles What Comes After the World's End

Emily St. John Mandel at the KUT studio
Mengwen Cao for Texas Standard

Imagine a world cloaked in silence. Silence that's interrupted by occasional gunfire. A world where you are one of the few people left alive. The other 99 percent have all died - all from a pandemic flu.

That's where Emily St. John Mandel's new novel, "Station Eleven"  begins. Amid all of the current panic surrounding Ebola, this book seems surprisingly topical. But "Station Eleven" is not your usual science fiction, post-apocalyptic story. Mandel likes to call it a story of "a Shakespearean theater company navigating celebrity, disastrous dinner parties, and friendship after the world, as we know it, has ended."

Emily St. John Mandel sits down with Texas Standard’s Emily Donahue to talk about her novel, that's just been short-listed for the National Book Award

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Texas Book Festival
5:07 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Like the Movie, This 'Boyhood' Book was 12 Years in the Making

"Boyhood" actor Ellar Coltrane through the years.
Matt Lankes / University of Texas Press

Richard Linklater’s "Boyhood" is unlike any other film. Over the course of 12 years, the cast and crew gathered to create the critically acclaimed coming-of age-story chronicling the journey of a young boy, played by Ellar Coltrane, from childhood to adulthood. And over the course of those 12 years, photographer Matt Lankes worked behind the scenes, shooting moments the making of "Boyhood" and the transformation of its characters. 

Lankes captures those moments from the film’s production in his new book, "Boyhood: Twelve Years on Film." He tells the story of the creation of the movie through stills from the film, behind-the-scenes shots, and intimate black and white portraits of the cast during each year of filming.

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Austin Film Festival
7:30 am
Thu October 23, 2014

TV, Marquee Screenings and Performing Animals at This Year's Austin Film Fest

Jon Stewart's "Rosewater" shows Oct. 30 at the Austin Film Festival.
"Rosewater"

KUT is a media sponsor of the Austin Film Festival.

The 21st Annual Austin Film Festival Starts today. The fest celebrates screenwriting and is equal parts conference, competition and screenings.

AFF Executive Director Barbara Morgan sat down with KUT's Laura Rice to talk about what's exciting to her about this year's fest.

On Television at the Fest:

"We have been doing television for a long time at the festival and, like everybody I think, I too, have become quite obsessed with a lot of different TV shows. We've really done a lot this year with marrying that television into both the conference and the festival. We've got panels with Noah Hawley, who created this year 'Fargo' for television - which was a really cool show. And then, of course, Cary Fukunaga of 'True Detective.'

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Arts Eclectic
9:34 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Celebrate 75 Years of 'The Grapes of Wrath'

Musician Rob Halverson has long been a fan of John Steinbeck's classic 1939 novel The Grapes of Wrath. So when it occurred to him last year that the book's 75th anniversary was quickly approaching, he decided to commemorate the occasion with a little help from Austin's artistic community.

Halverson's Grapes of Wrath 75 Project is a far-reaching and ongoing endeavor. It includes a cd and dvd of performance pieces and interviews about and inspired by the novel, as well as a journey undertaken by Halverson (in partnership with the National Steinbeck Center) in which he retraced the Route 66 journey of the novel's Joad family.

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The Write Up
3:30 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

How Novelist Louisa Hall Got From the Squash Court to 'The Carriage House'

Credit Louisa Hall

This month’s guest on "The Write Up" is novelist and poet Louisa Hall.

Louisa Hall’s life reads like a novel all its own – after graduating Harvard, she became a professional squash player, ranked second overall in the US. But near the height of her career, Hall abandoned the sport and headed to Texas to study literature at the University of Texas, write poetry, and begin working on her first novel.

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In Black America Podcast
1:18 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

In Black America Podcast: 'Culture Worrier' Clarence Page

Clarence Page, Syndicated Columnist and Author

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Clarence Page, syndicated columnist with the Chicago Tribune and author of "Culture Worrier."

Twice a week, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Page addresses the social, economic and political issues affecting Americans. Writing with passion and style, Page delivers lively commentary on today's pressing issues, such as crime, education, housing, hunger and bigotry.

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Two Guys on Your Head
10:53 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Why Do We Freak Out About Existential Threats Like Ebola?

Credit flickr.com/cdcglobal

With the arrival of Ebola on U.S. soil came the wall-to-wall media coverage one might expect. 

But does saturated coverage of threats like the Ebola virus and Islamic State militants do more harm than good and inspire less-than-rational thinking? 

In this week's "Two Guys on Your Head," Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke join KUT's Rebecca McInroy to talk about how the 24-hour news cycle causes readers, listeners and viewers to vicariously experience seemingly far-away threats, and how the availability of instant news causes some people to irrationally assess risks and threats. 

Arts Eclectic
7:00 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Pollyanna Commemorates 50 Years of the Civil Rights Act

Pollyanna Theater Company specializes in educational plays for young people. Performing in area schools and at the Rollins stage at the Long Center, they strive to produce works that will entertain kids while also teaching a lesson. 

This year, they've partnered with the LBJ Presidential Library to create an original play for kids to commorate the 50th anniversary of the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act.

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Arts Eclectic
3:43 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

Attend the Cinema Touching Disability Film Festival

Now in its eleventh year, the Cinema Touching Disability Film Festival aims to give exposure to films that portray disability in an honest and respectful way. The festival includes a short film competition, which has grown over the years to now include entrants from all over the world. 

The centerpieces of the fest, though, are the feature films that are shown on Friday and Saturday night. This year's Friday night film is Musical Chairs, which tells the story of a dance instructor who, after losing the use of her legs in an accident, learns to continue dancing in her wheelchair. Friday night also features a live performance by mixed ability dance project Body Shift.

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In Black America Podcast
2:33 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

In Black America Podcast: Dr. Richard J. Reddick Reflects on Michael Brown’s Death

Dr. Richard J. Reddick, Ed.D.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Richard J. Reddick, associate professor and coordinator at the University of Texas at Austin's College of Education, and a member of the 100 Black Men of Austin.

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Music
9:51 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Listen: John Aielli Sits Down With Tuvan Throat Singers

The members of the throat singing group Alash Ensemble: Ayan-ool Sam, Bady-Dorzhu Ondar and Ayan Shirizhik.
Matthew Yake

Our KUTX family is always working on interesting things. This week, in the short lull between the two weekends of Austin City Limits, host John Aielli did an interview we just had to share.

Aielli sat down with three throat singers from Tuva – a republic of about 300,000 people that's a subject of Russia, and is near Mongolia. The members of the group Alash Ensemble have trained in this style of song since their youth.

Though the group has gotten some broad attention, including collaborations with artists such as Béla Fleck, we'll bet you've never heard anything quite like this before.

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Life & Arts
6:57 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Homeless In Nashville, Huge In Sweden

"I was slapping myself in the face," singer Doug Seegers says of his recent success. "I kept saying, 'Am I dreaming? When am I going to wake up and go back to living under the bridge?' "
Gregg Roth Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:01 am

Country music fans were introduced to a new face at last month's Americana Music Awards in Nashville, when 62-year-old Doug Seegers opened the show with a song from his debut album, Going Down to the River.

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Texas Standard
3:28 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

James Ellroy's 'Perfidia' is a Noir Novel Without Good Guys

James Ellroy's latest novel, Perfidia, follows the Los Angeles Police Department's response to a brutal murder on the eve of Pearl Harbor.
Filipa Rodrigues/KUT

James Ellroy has a penchant for the persecuted.

His previous works including “L.A. Confidential,” “The Black Dahlia” and “The Big Nowhere” delve into forgotten times and seedy locales, where even the good guys have a bad streak.

His new noir novel “Perfidia,” like his other yarns, is a deep dive into Los Angeles during World War II, just after Pearl Harbor.

Ellroy spoke with Texas Standard’s Emily Donahue ahead of his appearance at his appearance at the Texas Book Festival later this month.

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Get Involved
9:29 am
Mon October 6, 2014

Get Involved Spotlight: Prevent Child Abuse Texas

 From Prevent Child Abuse Texas, this month's Get Involved spotlight non-profit:

Mission: Prevention of Child Abuse & Neglect In All Its Forms For All Children Throughout Texas.

Vision: One in which every child is free from abuse and neglect, safely nurtured by a loving family.  This vision is one in which every child lives in a community committed to preventing child abuse; to providing supports for parents, particularly new parents, which enable them to be effective parents; and to promoting the participation of all sectors of the community in a variety of efforts to prevent child abuse.

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In Black America Podcast
9:02 am
Mon October 6, 2014

In Black America Podcast: ‘No Love, No Charity’ with Paul Lamar Hunter

Paul Lamar Hunter

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Paul Lamar Hunter, author of ‘No Love, No Charity: the Success of the 19th Child.’

Though many would consider Hunter to be an unlikely candidate to become successful, his thrilling autobiographical account describes how he made it, despite overwhelming odds.

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Arts Eclectic
1:09 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

Consider 'A Mathematical Theory of Communication'

Casey Reas, detail of 'A Mathematical Theory of Communication'

UT's Landmarks public art program is dedicated to getting as much art as possible into public places on the University of Texas campus and around Austin. Over the past six years, they've put art in buildings and in outdoor spaces, with the goal of exposing people to art during their day-to-day lives. They're basically turning the UT campus into one big, free art museum.

Their latest installation will be unveiled inside the Gates Dell Computer Science Complex. Created by digital artist Casey Reas, A Mathematical Theory of Communication is a large mural that covers two large walls in the building's atrium. Reas met with professors and students in the Computer Sciences department to gather inspiration for the piece. 

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Arts Eclectic
10:54 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Nettie Reynolds Celebrates the Big 5-0

Writer and storyteller Nettie Reynolds has been performing in public for the past twenty years or so, and this weekend she'll be presenting her second full-length sort-of-one-woman show.

Though Reynolds is doing most of the heavy lifting, it's not exactly a solo show, as she'll be joined by a few of her friends -- Walter Daniels and Kacy Crowley will each sing a song, and Cate Berry and Bernadette Noll will each tell a story. 

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Life & Arts
8:39 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Lena Dunham's New Book, and the Finalists for the First Ever Kirkus Prize Announced

Kirkus Editor, Clay Smith
Photo by Michael Thad Carter

Many fans of the HBO series Girls are eagerly awaiting today's doorstep delivery of producer, creator, and lead actress Lena Dunham's first book. In Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She's "Learned," Dunham pens a series of essays that is part memoir, part advice book. 

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