Life & Arts

Entertainment, live performance, food, cuisine, dining, theater, film, television, art, broadcasting, SXSW, and other arts and culture news in and around Austin and the Central Texas counties of Travis, Hays, Caldwell, Bastrop and Williamson

Nathan Bernier/KUT News

Two panels, scheduled to be held during SXSW Interactive in March 2016, were canceled Monday on account of “numerous threats of on-site violence,” according to the press release sent out by the head of the conference, Hugh Forrest.

Tuesday 5:40 p.m. Following today's developments, SXSW's Hugh Forrest has released a new statement on its website under the headline "Safety Is A Top Priority And So Is Your Voice":

Rodolfo Gonzales, Austin American-Statesman

Austin's restaurant scene continues to boom along with the city's economy, but who has time to keep track of the constant openings and closings?

At least one man does. Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam is out with his annual dining guide. KUT's Nathan Bernier asks him about it. 


Check out the guide here

On October 30 and 31, Wizard World Comic Con returns to Austin, and it'll feature all the stuff you expect in such an event. There will be plenty of special guests, mostly familiar faces from geek-friendly and/or genre movies and TV shows (including Evil Dead's Bruce Campbell and RoboCop/Buckaroo Banzai portrayer Peter Weller among others), but also a surprising number of sports figures (including Texas legend Earl Campbell, no relation to Bruce). There will be lots of comic book writers and artists. There will be panel discussions such as "How to Write Comics" and "Diversity in Geek Culture." There will be lots of comics and colletables for sale and lots of people in elaborate costumes.

On this episode Brian Ramos talks with filmmakers and showrunners Robert Rodriguez, David Simon and David Webb Peoples.

Image via Flickr/Marc E. (CC BY-2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Lady Gaga is just as well known for her fashion as she is for her music.

Ransom Center via YouTube

The archives of Gabriel García Márquez, the Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist, are now open to the public and they’re located here in the capital city, at the University of Texas at Austin's Harry Ransom Center.

This Saturday night, The Vortex is hosting 'Salvador Dali's Naked Feast," a performance/cocktail party that will also serve as a fundraiser for the upcoming Vortex season.

The entire Vortex compound (which now includes the theater space itself, the Butterfly Bar,  and Patrizi's Italian Restaurant) will be overtaken by the party, which will feature aerial performances, live music, dance, food, cocktails, and more. 

The Top 12 Quotes From 'Lonesome Dove'

Oct 21, 2015
Image via Motown Productions/Pangaea/Qintex Entertainment

From Texas Standard:

Spoiler alert! In case you've been under a rock in Ogallala for the last three decades, this story contains spoilers for "Lonesome Dove."

Since I am, like many Texans, an amateur expert on "Lonesome Dove," people often ask me what I figure are the most loved quotes from the miniseries.

If I were wise, I would just say any of a hundred quotes could be someone’s number one, and leave it at that. But I have never let lack of wisdom stop me. I cannot resist the challenge of making a list. I know it is a delicate business; it is holy ground.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Gayle Wald, Professor of English and American Studies at George Washington University and author of ‘It’s Been Beautiful’: Soul! and Black Power Television.

‘Soul!’ on Public Television from 1968 to 1973, was the only national TV show dedicated to cultural and political expressions of Black Power.

Photo by Suzanne Reiss

Debra Monroe is an award-winning author of six books and acclaimed university professor. But she was, in her own words, “raised to be a farmer’s wife, a shopkeeper’s wife, a telephone man’s wife.”

Texas Book Festival

From Texas Standard:

This weekend tens of thousands of Texans will descend on the grounds of the state capitol for a little shindig called the Texas Book Festival. The annual celebration of all things literary will host 300 authors this year – the biggest yet.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Darrell M. Newton, Associate Dean and Professor in the Fulton School of Liberal Arts, Salisbury University.

Since 1979, Newton has been working in higher education. He also teaches media and cultural studies, film, broadcast writing and international media as a full professor in the Communication Arts department.

Bengt Nyman/Wikimedia Commons

From Texas Standard: There are lots of musicians who can claim to be from Texas, but only a handful who are convincing enough to make you believe they're really from the Lone Star State — even though they're not. 

Image via YouTube

From Texas Standard:

Today, the Houston hip-hop sound is known around the world: hypnotic, narcotic slow-motion beats, pioneered by DJ Screw, which have found their way from the bayous of Syrup City to the Billboard Top 10.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with ReShonda Tate Billingsley, award-winning national bestselling author and co-founder of Brown Girls Books.

Image via Flickr/Embajada de EEUU en la Argentina (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Sandra Cisneros is a daughter of Texas.

She isn’t really a Texan, per se, but her writing – mostly involving Latinos and Latino issues – has so resonated among Texas audiences that she was awarded the Texas Medal of the Arts. She was writer-in-residence at Our Lady of The Lake University in San Antonio once upon a time and received the Texas Institute of Letters Dobie Paisano Fellowship.

Cisneros is the author of “The House on Mango Street.” It’s a book so beloved that it’s required reading in middle schools, high schools and universities across the country. It’s sold over six million copies since its initial publication and it’s still selling strongly.

Tomorrow, Cisneros releases her memoir, “A House of My Own.”


The dark comedy Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric play debuted to acclaim and award nominations in 2012, and this fall it makes its regional debut in Austin, courtesy of the theater program at St. Edward's University. David Long, artistic director of St. Ed's Mary Moody Northen Theatre, was keen to bring Mr. Burns to Austin because he was "excited about not only the premise, but the content, dealing with something that travels in time, and most importantly... the importance of community [and] theater."

See Rothko's Roots in a New Houston Retrospective

Oct 1, 2015
Flickr/Stefan Klocek (CC)

From Texas StandardIf you want to understand American art, there are a handful of names you have to know. Nearly everyone would agree that one of them is Mark Rothko.

From Farmshare Austin, this month's Get Involved spotlight organization: Farmshare Austin is a 501c3 that teaches organic agriculture and provides fresh produce to partnering nonprofits that alleviate hunger and supply nutritious food to low income individuals.

Cornell University

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Edward E. Baptist, Professor in the Department of History, and House Dean, Becker House at Cornell University.

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation’s original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America’s later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy.