9:50 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Controversial Texas Voter ID Law Begins Federal Trial

The trial for the new Texas Voter ID law begins today.

The controversial Voter ID Law that passed last year in the Texas State Legislature is going before a federal court. The trial begins today to determine if Texas can implement the law, which requires voters to show government-issued photo identification.

The state says the law will prevent voter fraud. The Justice Department worries it will disenfranchise Hispanic voters and claims it violates the federal Voting Rights Act.  A disproportionate number of minorities in Texas lack the necessary identification, which would prevent them from voting. Texas will have to persuade a three-judge panel of the law’s legality.

The Mexican American Legislative Caucus says during the 2008 and 2010 elections there was only one case of voter fraud in over 13 million ballots cast.

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12:42 pm
Wed May 23, 2012

Minorities Undercounted in 2010 U.S. Census

The 2010 Census is being described as successful thanks to outreach and advertising campaigns.
Photo by KUT News

An analysis of the 2010 U.S. Census shows the population was slightly overcounted, by about 0.01 percent or 36,000 people.

That means the latest census was more accurate than the 2000 Census, which had an overcount of about 0.49 percent. Census Bureau Director Robert Groves says the 2010 Census was "outstanding." But the analysis found that accuracy varied by demographics.

The 2010 Census overcounted whites by .08 percent, undercounted 2.1 percent of the African-American population, and undercounted 1.5 percent of the Hispanic population. 

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2012 Presidential Election
1:14 pm
Wed May 16, 2012

Latino Voters: Seen, But Will They Be Heard, In 2012?

Latinos protest Mitt Romney's opposition to the Dream Act, outside his campaign headquarters in Las Vegas on Feb 2.
Michael Thurston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 3:03 pm

If young voters were the breakout stars of the 2008 presidential election, then Latino voters may take center stage this year.

Every other week or so, it seems, a new poll gauges Latinos' opinions about the candidates, the issues and their level of engagement. Both parties are pouring millions into their Latino outreach. Latino politicians have assumed prominent roles in the conventions of the Republican and Democratic parties. And a Latino senator is on the short list of potential running mates for presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney.

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1:42 pm
Wed April 4, 2012

Hispanic or Latino? Most Spanish Speakers Say Neither

A recent study found American Hispanics prefer to identify with their country of ancestry.
Photo courtesy

"Hispanic," or "Latino?"  Turns out, most Americans of Spanish-speaking origin don't find either term specific enough.

A survey released by the Pew Hispanic Center this morning shows more than half of those surveyed want be known by their family's country of origin: 51 percent surveyed said they preferred to be called "Mexican" or "Argentinian," for example.

According to the Pew Hispanic Center, just 24 percent  say they use the terms "Hispanic" or "Latino" most often to describe their identity. And 21 percent  say they use the term “American” most often.

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Arts and Culture
8:04 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Media Outlets Adapt to Growing Hispanic Audience

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 1:01 pm

Rapid growth in the U.S. Hispanic community has created another boom — in Hispanic media. In recent months, several major media players have announced plans to join the competition for the Hispanic television audience. There's a new Hispanic broadcast TV network coming, plus a host of new cable channels aimed at Latinos.

The numbers tell the story: According to the census, the U.S. Hispanic population jumped by more than 40 percent in the past decade. The nation's 50 million-plus Hispanics now make up 16 percent of the TV-viewing public.

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2:15 pm
Wed February 8, 2012

How Does Austin Compare for African-American, Latino Opportunity?

A still of an interactive map from the Urban Institute, ranking equity for African-Americans and Latinos around the country.
Image courtesy

An interactive map crunching data from the 2010 census gives Austin a letter grade of C on racial equity for Latinos, and B for African-Americans.

The map, published on the Urban Institute’s MetroTrends website, looks at “five indicators of metro-wide racial equity:” the degree of residential segregation, gaps in neighborhood income, school testing scores, employment, and homeownership between the respective minority groups and whites.

The map averages scores across the Austin-Round Rock-San  Marcos-area to deliver an overall grade of C for Latinos, or 56th out of the top 100 largest metro areas. The data displays high reads on the residential segregation gap (43.2%), testing scores (37.2%), and homeownership (33.6%). It ranks equity for African-American Austin metro residents as slightly higher, with a grade of B, ranking the area 31st of 100.

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