Lance Armstrong

Hundreds of samples taken from riders in this summer's Tour de France found no signs of doping, officials say. The epic race, which was put on for the hundredth time in 2013, has been at the center of recent doping scandals.

Anti-doping officials say they took 202 blood and urine samples before the race began, and an additional 419 during competition. Nearly 200 of those samples were taken with the goal of creating a "biological passport" for riders, to establish a baseline of their body chemistry.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Tomorrow marks the 100th edition of the Tour de France and Lance Armstrong — despite being stripped of his 7 Tour de France titles — still believes he's the race's greatest contender.

According to the French newspaper Le Monde, Lance Armstrong said he still considers himself the record-holder of tour victories despite being stripped of his titles this year after admitting to doping allegations.

Update: Nike has produced merchandise with the Livestrong logo for nine years – raising more than $100 million for the foundation. But Nike will stop making the merchandise after this holiday season.

According to Livestrong Vice President of Communications & External Affairs Katherine McLane, Nike will stop production before the end of 2013 – that's before the contract ends in December 2014.

Armstrong Will Sit Out Swimming Competition

Apr 4, 2013
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Try as he might, Lance Armstrong just can’t return to competitive sport.

Armstrong was slated to compete in the Masters South Central Zone Swimming Championships this weekend at the University of Texas. But the executive director of U.S. Masters Swimming tells the AP the former cyclist decided not to swim after international swimming authorities objected. 

Armstrong is under a lifetime ban from the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency for using performance enhancing drugs.

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The Livestrong Foundation says it is bigger than its founder and it will survive past the scandal surrounding Lance Armstrong.

“I have to tell you that over the past months, I felt most indignant when our team’s credibility has been called into question as a result of something that had nothing to do with them," Andy Miller, the non-profit's vice president, said at the foundation's annual meeting today in Chicago.

The Justice Department has joined a civil lawsuit against cyclist Lance Armstrong, his Tailwind Sports team and its longtime manager, alleging their pervasive doping campaign defrauded the U.S. Postal Service out of more than $31 million in sponsorship fees.

The decision ratchets up the legal pressure on Armstrong, who's lost his seven Tour de France titles, enormous advertising and sponsorship deals, and a large part of his reputation.

Lance Armstrong will not cooperate with a United States Anti-Doping Agency probe into doping in the cycling world.

Bloomberg reports Armstrong missed a deadline set by USADA today. Armstrong's lawyer said he would not cooperate because the probe was too narrow.

Bloomberg adds:

A famous doctor is on trial in Spain, accused of masterminding one of the world's biggest sports doping rings. His clients are believed to include at least one former teammate of disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong and dozens of other cyclists who raced against him.

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Update: Omar Martinez, 27, was the overall winner at this year's Austin Marathon. He finished the 26.2 miles in just over 2 hours and 35 minutes. Kyle Smith, 26, was the fastest finisher from Austin. He came in 4th place overall.

Thirty-one year old Mariko Neveu of Austin took first place among the women. She finished in just over 2 hours and 55 minutes.

You can check your own, your friend's, or any other competitor's time at the Austin Marathon results page.

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Dallas-based sports insurance and promotion company SCA Promotions is suing former cyclist Lance Armstrong for more than $12 million.

The damages, the company says, are for prize money paid to Armstrong for his 2002, 2003 and 2004 Tour de France wins, and for legal costs accrued during a previous lawsuit.

George Burns, Oprah WInfrey Network

Good morning. The National Weather Service says Austin’s due for a high near 70, along with scattered clouds and maybe a stray thunderstorm.

Lead Story: Federal prosecutors say Lance Armstrong won’t face criminal charges, despite the cycling star’s confession last month to Oprah Winfrey that he did use performance-enhancing drugs.  

The U.S. Attorney in the case says the decision was made last year not to press charges, and Armstrong’s recent televised comments haven’t convinced prosecutors to re-open the case.

Lance Armstrong says a “full blown, global” Truth and Reconciliation Commission is the only way for cycling to move past doping scandals.

In his first interview since admitting to doping, Armstrong says cyclists need to be assured that there won’t be consequences if they share the truth.

Daniel Benson is the Managing Editor at Cyclingnews.com. He told KUT that to get the interview with Armstrong—all he had to do was ask.

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Reports that an Australian library is moving books by and about Lance Armstrong from non-fiction to fiction have proven false, much to the disappointment of those leaving comments on Amazon.com.

USA Today, the UK’s Daily Mail and more recently tech-news site Mashable have all reported that Manly Library, a public library in Sydney, recatalogued Armstrong books following the cyclist’s confession to Oprah Winfrey last week. In an exclusive interview with the talk show host, Armstrong admitted to doping, lying and bullying.

In an interview that aired last night on the Oprah Winfrey Network, Lance Armstrong confessed that he doped. That confession, added to mountains of other evidence, could cost him millions of dollars. There are three groups of people he may owe money to:

1. SCA Promotions

SCA is a company that underwrote millions of dollars of bonuses that Lance received for winning the Tour de France. Now that he's been stripped of those titles — they want their money back.

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

The Lance Armstrong Bikeway opened in 2009. It was an example of the city's enthusiasm for cycling – which was, in part, prompted by Armstrong's success.

It's fair to say that, because of Armstrong's cycling achievements and active role in supporting those fighting cancer, Armstrong was a sort of icon in Austin.

But after Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Oprah Winfrey last night, the Austin community is starting to question if his influence in town is appropriate.

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(Updated at 10:40 a.m. to include Livestrong Foundation's CEO comments on The Today Show.)

The Livestrong Foundation—the Austin-based non-profit that Lance Armstrong founded to help people battling cancer—has been a major part of the conversation in the fallout surrounding the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's report on Armstrong's doping. Now, it's also a player after Armstrong's confession.

The Livestrong Foundation released a statement following the first part of Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey.

The statement says employees are disappointed that Armstrong misled them during and after his cycling career. But it also says employees accept Armstrong’s apology from earlier this week and want to move on.

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Oprah Winfrey last night. For many Austinites, the much-anticipated confession was worth a special viewing appointment. And for some, it even called for a watch party.

A few dozen watch party attendees crowded around picnic tables on the patio and at the u-shaped wood bar at Little Woodrow’s on Sixth Street as they waited for the tell-all from the Texas native on his decade-long doping cover up.

(We updated the top of this post at 10:40 p.m. ET.)

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating on all his seven Tour de France victories.

In an interview with Oprah Winfrey, the second part of which airs Friday, Armstrong said he was never afraid of getting caught and attributed his actions to a "ruthless desire to win."

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong's confession to doping isn't just a matter of passing interest to sports fans, it has the potential to be pivotal new evidence in a raft of legal matters that have swirled around the cycling star for years.

Armstrong already has lost his battle with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, which detailed "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program" in sports when it announced a lifetime ban of the cyclist last October.

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