Ken Paxton

Marjorie Kamys Cotera

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has received a new judge in his securities fraud case — a newly elected Democrat who unseated Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick's son last year.

Cooper Neill for The Texas Tribune

A state appeals court ruled Tuesday that the judge in Attorney General Ken Paxton's securities fraud case lost jurisdiction when he sent it to Harris County in April. The court also directed the judge, George Gallagher, to vacate all subsequent orders, including one that set a September trial date.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Texas is preemptively suing the City of Austin, Travis County and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund to enforce the state’s newly minted “sanctuary city” law, Senate Bill 4.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera

State District Judge George Gallagher will remain on the securities fraud case against Attorney General Ken Paxton, according to a spokeswoman for the judge.

It was originally believed Gallagher would have to rule on a request Paxton's lawyers made this month for a new judge. But the spokeswoman, Melody McDonald Lanier, said Monday that he does not and will continue presiding over the case.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton's trial on securities fraud charges has been moved to Harris County.

Last month, the judge in the case ordered the trial moved out of Collin County, where Paxton resides. Prosecutors had argued Paxton and his allies had tainted the jury pool there.

"Harris County was selected because the lead counsel for the state and the defense are located there," the judge, George Gallagher, said in a statement. "Harris County also has the facilities to accommodate the trial."

Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

The judge in the securities fraud case against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has ruled that the trial should be moved out of Collin County and delayed.

The ruling to change venue is a major victory for prosecutors, who had argued Paxton and his allies had tainted the jury pool in Collin County, where he lives.

Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

A federal judge has again thrown out securities fraud charges against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, effectively ending one of two legal battles that have dogged Paxton for close to a year.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Attorney General Ken Paxton issued an amicus brief Wednesday expressing his support of President Donald Trump's travel ban, effectively becoming the first state attorney general to back the controversial executive order. 

Marjorie Kamys Cotera

The prosecutors in Attorney General Ken Paxton's securities fraud case are asking for a change of venue, arguing they cannot get a fair trial in Collin County. 

Bill Clark for The Texas Tribune

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s trial on criminal securities fraud charges is set to begin May 1.

Jury selection will be held April 20-21 and April 27-28, according to a recent order by George Gallagher, the judge presiding over Paxton’s case. He also scheduled a hearing on pretrial motions for Feb. 16.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera, Texas Tribune

A federal judge in Sherman has blocked a White House effort to make millions more workers eligible for overtime pay, handing a victory to Texas and 20 others states that had challenged the new Labor Department rule.

U.S. District Judge Amos Mazzant granted a nationwide injunction Tuesday against the rule, which was set to go into effect Dec. 1. The rule aimed to double the salary threshold under which employees qualify for overtime pay, extending it to an estimated 4.2 million more workers. 

MARJORIE KAMYS COTERA / TEXAS TRIBUNE

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is now almost certain to stand trial on criminal fraud charges. That’s because the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals today refused Paxton’s last request to have the felony indictments dismissed.

KUT's Nathan Bernier learns more from Dallas Morning News reporter Lauren McGaughy.


Bill Clark for Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: The highest criminal court in Texas said Wednesday it will not hear Ken Paxton's appeal of securities fraud charges, putting the attorney general on a path to facing a trial in the coming months. 

Bill Clark/Texas Tribune

A judge has thrown out a federal civil case accusing Attorney General Ken Paxton of securities fraud, giving him his biggest legal victory yet since the allegations surfaced more than a year ago. 

Courtesy Amber Briggle

From Texas Standard:

Earlier this week, a federal judge sided with Texas' request to block a federal directive for schools to accommodate the bathroom choices of transgender students. Attorney General Ken Paxton said he was pleased – but not surprised – by the court's order, and subsequently filed suit to remove discrimination protections against health insurers.

The Human Rights Campaign, among others, blasted that move as shameful, cheap and political. Others have been far more harsh in their assessments – both of Paxton and Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who says he's not sure he's ever known a transgender person.

 


Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, facing federal and state securities fraud charges, is getting more than a little help from his friends to foot his growing legal bill.

The Republican accepted more than $329,000 earmarked for his legal defense from donors and “family friends,” according to a newly released financial disclosure statement.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Volkswagen has agreed to pay Texas $50 million in connection with the German automaker's admitted peddling of diesel vehicles rigged to surpass emissions limits, Attorney General Ken Paxton announced Tuesday.

Image via Flickr/SmartSign (CC BY 2.0)

Parents of transgender children here in Texas spoke up on Tuesday against Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and Attorney General Ken Paxton. Both officials are leading the state’s opposition to a new directive from the Obama administration that says students need to be allowed to use the bathroom that corresponds with their gender identity. The parents say state leaders are creating a hostile environment for their children.


Laura Buckman / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Texas, joined by 10 other states, filed a lawsuit Wednesday to stop a federal directive instructing school districts to let transgender students use the bathroom that corresponds with their gender identity, Attorney General Ken Paxton announced Wednesday.

Callie Richmond and Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Will public schools really lose federal education funding if they refuse to comply with a new Obama administration directive regarding transgender students?

That's the basic query posed by top lawyers from Texas, Oklahoma and West Virginia in a letter sent Tuesday to the U.S. Justice and Education departments seeking clarification on the directive, which advises the nation's public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms that match their gender identity.

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