juvenile justice

Callie Hernandez / KUT

The Austin City Council approved a resolution Thursday to create a study committee on the school-to-prison pipeline. 

That's a term used to describe practices in schools that expose students to the wrong side of the criminal justice system. One example is when schools turn to law enforcement to address student misbehavior, such as receiving a criminal citation for disorderly conduct.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

In a unanimous vote, the Austin City Council ended the city's late-night curfew for minors last night.

The ordinance, which made it a Class C misdemeanor for anyone under 17 to be out in public from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m., was on the books for 27 years.

Pexels (CC0)

From Texas Standard:

The Texas Legislature has discussed the idea of raising the age of criminal responsibility during the two most recent sessions. It’s a topic that will be debated this weekend at the Texas Tribune Festival in Austin. Several proposals would consider treating 17-year-olds as juveniles, rather than adults, for purposes of criminal prosecution and sentencing. That change would align Texas with the majority of the country. Many proponents of such a change cite new research regarding cognitive development and lowered recidivism rates for offenders in the juvenile justice system. And there may be another reason making such a change could benefit the state.

ErikaWittlieb/Pixabay (CC0)

From Texas Standard:

Texas is one of six states that tries 17-year-olds as adults. But a new bill wants Texas to follow the national trend of raising the age of criminal responsibility from 17 to 18.

House Bill 122, authored by Reps. Harold Dutton Jr. (D-Houston) and Gene Wu (D-Houston), passed the House last week and could be on its way to the Senate.


Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

About 15 middle- and high-school students sit in a row of seats in a dark courtroom on a Monday night at Austin Municipal Court. A few of the students are talking quietly, but most of them are silent. No one looks like they want to be here. They were caught out of school by a police officer, and now they’re at the court's juvenile curfew class.

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