journalism

Texas
2:09 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

In ‘Into the Field’ a Veteran Foreign Correspondent Tells His Own Story

Author Tracy Dahlby (second from right) dines with a group of students during a 2008 China trip.
Rebecca Davis

As the world becomes increasingly interconnected through technology, the need for international news has steadily increased. But America’s appetite for foreign journalism has never been that large.

Many traditional news outlets have cut down on foreign correspondents, which makes author and professor Tracy Dahlby an increasingly rare subspecies of journalist. Dahlby’s memoir, “Into the Field: A Foreign Correspondent’s Notebook,” provides a remarkable look at his vast experiences in Asia and the transformation of media that’s still on the way.

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In Black America Podcast
9:33 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

In Black America Podcast: The Life and Legacy of Robert C. Maynard

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Robert C. Maynard, journalist, newspaper publisher, editor and former owner of the Oakland (CA) Tribune newspaper.

  Maynard was a charismatic leader who changed the face of American journalism, built a four-decade career on the cornerstones of editorial integrity, community involvement, improved education and the importance of the family. He was the co-founder of the Institute for Journalism Education, a nonprofit corporation dedicated to expanding opportunities for minority journalists at the nation's newspapers.  

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Special Coverage
6:28 am
Thu February 20, 2014

#GoneToGhana: A Trip in Tweets

Jessica Opare Saforo, left, is a popular radio presenter at Citi FM in Accra, Ghana. I spent a few days at the station during my trip to Ghana.
Laura Rice, KUT News

I spent two weeks in the West African country of Ghana in late January and early February. The trip was part of an exchange program through the International Center for Journalists and was sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

The goal of my journey was to learn about the media climate of an another country and to collect stories to share via KUT. Along the way, I tweeted.

Here's a look at the story my tweets tell:

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Special Coverage
9:06 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Gone to Ghana: Journalism's Not a Dirty Word

Citi FM Director of News Programming Bernard Avle (left) practices interviewing skills with a young journalist at a workshop.
Laura Rice for KUT.

The purpose of my journey to Ghana is to learn about the media industry and the daily lives of journalists. The exchange program I'm on through the International Center for Journalists also sent Ghanaian journalists to the United States. Three other countries (Kenya, Nigeria and Uganda) are also part of the exchange.

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Attorney General
3:40 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Holder Defends Subpoena Of Journalists' Phone Logs

Attorney General Eric Holder says he recused himself last year from a national security leak probe in which prosecutors obtained the phone records of Associated Press journalists.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder has defended the Justice Department's actions in secretly obtaining journalists' phone records as part of a probe into leaks of classified material, but said he himself had nothing to do with the subpoena.

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Latin America
8:05 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Mexican Crime Reporters Risk Becoming the Story

A woman lights a candle during a tribute to slain Mexican journalists at the Monument of Independence in Mexico City on May 5. The vigil took place to protest violence against the press after the brutal murders of four journalists in Veracruz state.
Sashenka Gutierrez EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 8:37 am

Mexico is reeling from another round of brutal murders of journalists. Four journalists and photographers who covered the police beat have been killed in eastern Mexico's crime-ridden state of Veracruz.

There's a new call for the federal government to take measures to protect journalists in a country where more and more reporters censor themselves out of fear.

The ceremony to remember the most recent killings took place last weekend in Mexico City on the steps of the Monument of Independence between statues depicting peace and law.

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Austin
11:37 am
Fri May 20, 2011

Journalist From Pakistani Tribal Area Shares Impressions of Austin

Tayyeb Afridi
Photo by Nathan Bernier for KUT News

Tayyeb Afridi is visiting KUT from the Federally Administered Tribal Area of Pakistan, a region that borders Afghanistan. He is on a US Pakistan Journalism Exchange through the International Center for Journalists.

From the moment I stepped off the plane, I was struck by how different everything looked – especially the way people dressed.  If I were to judge Americans’ dress by Pakistan’s dress code, they would be considered nude. I saw men and women both showing their legs, arms and sometimes even midriffs.  I had to remind myself, “Hey man, this isn’t rare; it’s the culture of America. That doesn’t mean that short dress should be a sign of nudity.”

I was really looking forward to a wonderful adventure of 33 days in the United States of America.  The first six days flew by. It was very busy, so busy that I didn’t have a chance to think about what I had seen on my first day.

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Education
4:35 pm
Mon December 27, 2010

Journalism Groups Slam Texas A&M For Open Records Policy

Texas A&M University recently barred its employees from telling students to file open records requests under the state's public information act. Now, a group of fifteen journalism organizations is weighing in on the debate.

A letter from the groups, posted on the Poynter journalism blog, accuses the University of using a "potentially illegal" policy to "squelch investigations by its own students."

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