immigration

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Amid some uncertainty and confusion regarding the country's refugee resettlement program, the federal agency in charge of helping refugees resettle has designated a group of nonprofits that will take over services previously carried out by the State of Texas.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Travis County raised nearly $90,000 as of Monday afternoon through an online initiative set up after Gov. Greg Abbott cut $1.5 million in grant funding over the sheriff’s new immigration policy. State Rep. Eddie Rodriguez (D-Austin) launched the fundraising site Friday in partnership with the Austin Community Foundation.

Immigration activists and attorneys in Travis County are bracing for the possibility of deportation raids by federal officials in the coming days. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Texas lawmakers heard hours of public testimony Thursday and into early Friday morning over a bill banning so-called “sanctuary cities” in Texas, ultimately voting early this morning 7-2 along party lines to send the bill to the full Senate.

Stephanie Tacy for KUT

It has been about a week since President Trump signed an executive order banning travel into the U.S. from seven majority-Muslim countries. Trump said the ban is an effort to stop terrorists from entering the country, even though refugees already go through an extensive screening process. Local groups who help resettle refugees in Texas say they still don’t know what this means for the families they were expecting this week.

GABRIELLA DEMCZUK FOR NPR

Last week, President Trump signed an executive order suspending new-refugee admissions for 120 days and blocking travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries — Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Somalia — for 90 days. Syrian refugees are banned indefinitely.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

The Travis County sheriff’s new immigration policy goes into effect today. The policy limits what information local law enforcement share with the federal immigration agency, and it's already stirred up a lot of controversy.

This morning, Gov. Greg Abbott came through on a pledge to cancel $1.5 million in criminal justice grants from his office to Travis County over the policy.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

In his letter to faculty and students Sunday, University of Texas at Austin President Greg Fenves addressed President Donald Trump’s recent executive order temporarily closing the county to immigrants from seven Muslim-majority nations.

Stephanie Tacy for KUT

Faith groups and supporters of the refugee community gathered at a church near UT-Austin’s campus last night in solidarity with refugees already resettled in Texas following President Donald Trump’s executive order banning refugees from predominately Muslim countries.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Thousands are protesting President Donald Trump’s executive order banning refugees from seven predominately Muslim countries. While federal judges have temporarily stayed parts of that order across the country, notably a provision that would deport some refugees detained at airports, demonstrators have staged protests at airports across the country, including at Austin Bergstrom International Airport.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

WASHINGTON — A lone Republican, U.S. Rep. Will Hurd of Helotes, joined a handful of the Texas delegation's Democrats in challenging President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel from seven predominantly Muslim countries. And while the Texas Republican overseeing Homeland Security attempted to distance himself from Trump's action, most of the delegation reacted with silence. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

The governor’s office has asked state agencies to send a list of funds, including federal money, directed to Travis County last year. In a letter sent Thursday, Budget Director Steven Albright said the list “should be complete with the amount of funds and the purpose of the agreement” and be submitted by Feb. 3.

Dani Matias for KUT

In response to vows from the state and federal government to knock out so-called “sanctuary cities," roughly 30 people crowded around a rickety podium Wednesday to announce their support of Travis County Sheriff Sally Hernandez’s immigration policy.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed two executive orders related to immigration and border security, moving ahead with his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and to deport people who are in the country illegally.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

“[A] dangerous game of political Russian roulette.” That’s how Texas Gov. Greg Abbott described Travis County Sheriff Sally Hernandez’s immigration policy, which was released Friday. And, this morning, Abbott told Fox News that he's directing lawmakers to draft a bill that would penalize similar policies and threatened to remove Hernandez from office.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security/Flickr (Government Work)

From Texas Standard:

President Donald Trump called for a “complete shutdown of Muslims” entering the United States during his campaign. He falsely claimed the U.S. has no system to vet refugees seeking to enter the country. He’s also championed creating an “extreme vetting” process for any and all immigrants and visitors to the U.S. – mapping out a three-pronged approach to immigration.

Illustration by Todd Wiseman

The Obama administration’s halt of a decades-long provision that allowed Cubans who arrived at U.S. land ports to be given immediate legal status will likely put an abrupt end to the flood of Cubans arriving in Texas since 2014.

 

He is known only as Case 0408. The remains of a middle-aged male immigrant were discovered in Jim Hogg County, Texas, on Nov. 3, 2009. Six belongings are the only things in the universe that may help identify him: a beat-up sneaker, a size L pullover shirt and hoodie, a ring found sewn into the waistband of his pants, a red and black lucha libre wrestler's mask, and a stuffed smiley lion.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

In the days after the presidential election, a group of immigration attorneys in Austin started talking about what they could do to address concerns among Austin's immigrant community.  Ultimately, they formed a group called Texas Here To Stay and have been working to naturalize immigrants.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Half a dozen posters depicting that British hit band the Beatles color the walls of Justin Estep’s office on Rutherford Lane in North Austin. It brings some levity to an otherwise tense space.

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