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In Black America Podcast
11:03 am
Thu April 9, 2015

A Talk With Major League Baseball Legend and Hall-of-Famer Hank Aaron [Part II]

LBJ Presidential Library Director Mark Updegrove talks with Hank Aaron
LBJ Library photo by Lauren Gerson

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. conclude his highlights of a conversation with Hank Aaron, Civil Rights Activist, Major League Baseball legend, Hall of Famer, and senior vice president of the Atlanta Braves, at the 2015 Tom Johnson Lecture series.

Before joining the Braves front office, Aaron enjoyed a 23-year major league career during which he rewrote baseball’s hitting record book. He holds more major league batting records than any other player in the game’s history. On May 17, 1970, Aaron became the first player to compile both 3,000 career hits and more than 500 homers. Along with Frank Robinson, Aaron was inducted into the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown, NY, on August 1, 1982.

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In Black America Podcast
9:31 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

A Talk With Major League Baseball Legend and Hall-of-Famer Hank Aaron

LBJ Presidential Library Director Mark Updegrove talks with Hank Aaron
LBJ Library photo by Lauren Gerson

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents highlights of a conversation with Hank Aaron, Civil Rights Activist, Major League Baseball legend, Hall of Famer, and senior vice president of the Atlanta National League Baseball Club, Inc., at the 2015 Tom Johnson Lecture series.

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Austin
7:43 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

This Downtown Austin Bridge Could Be Named A National Landmark

Ted Lee Eubanks http://www.tedleeeubanksphotography.com

An easy-to-miss bridge on W. Sixth Street could be added to the National Register of Historic Places. The West Sixth Street Bridge sits over Shoal Creek, between West Avenue and Wood Street (near Hut's Hamburgers). It was built by hand in 1887. 

"It doesn't look like much when you go over it, and people use it all the time." says Joanna Wolaver, executive director of the Shoal Creek Conservancy. "But if you take a minute to walk down the dirt path to the Shoal Creek trail, it's just gorgeous." 

Last Saturday, the Texas Historical Commission approved an application to recommend nomination of the bridge to the National Register of Historic Places. The U.S. Parks Service will have the final say and could decide by the fall. 

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Austin
8:20 am
Mon February 17, 2014

Presidents to Gather in Austin this Spring for Civil Rights Summit

President Lyndon Johnson meets with Martin Luther King in the White House Cabinet Room in 1966. April's summit will highlight the changes that the civil rights movement brought to America.
Yoichi R. Okamoto Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum

The history and the current state of the civil rights struggle will be examined at a three-day summit in Austin this spring. The conference will focus on President Lyndon Johnson’s civil rights legacy.

The Civil Rights Summit will be held April 8-10 at the LBJ Presidential Library – and will mark the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act by President Johnson.

Mark Updegrove, director of the LBJ Presidential Library, says two former presidents have confirmed their attendance: Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton. President George W. Bush has not yet confirmed, and there is the possibility of President Barack Obama attending.

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Presidential history
7:00 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Interview: Pulitzer Prize Author Takes Close Look at Woodrow Wilson's Legacy

Woodrow Wilson and William Taft. Berg combed through hundreds of thousands of documents in the Wilson Archives for this biography.
Putnam Books

One hundred years ago, a president took office who would set the course of the American century, end an era of isolationism, set the stage for the New Deal and eventually become one of the most controversial and fundamentally misunderstood figures ever to lead the nation.

A new biography corrects a lot of misconceptions about the 28th president, but perhaps more importantly humanizes and brings to life an important figure in the American narrative.

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