Hillary Clinton

Michael Stravato / Shelby Tauber via Texas Tribune

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is leading Democratic rival Hillary Clinton by just 6 percentage points in deep-red Texas, according to a new poll. 

Trump gets 44 percent support to Clinton's 38 percent in the survey, which was done by Democratic-leaning firm Public Policy Polling. Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson received 6 percent, while Green Party nominee Jill Stein got 2 percent.

Instagram/Hillary Clinton

From Texas Standard:

Hillary Clinton gives her big speech tonight accepting the Democratic nomination at the party's convention tonight in Philadelphia.

Perhaps you caught the speech from her husband, talking about Hillary's time in south Texas.

"She met one of the nicest fellas I've ever met, the wonderful union leader Franklin Garcia," Bill Clinton said in his speech Tuesday. "He helped her register Mexican-American voters. I think some of them are still around to vote for her in 2016."

If the name Franklin Garcia sounds familiar, there's a reason for that.

 


Democrats called on Americans to reject what they called the politics of fear and division of the GOP and elect Hillary Clinton during the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Donald Trump urged Russian agents to "find" his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton's emails and release them, an unprecedented move by a candidate for president encouraging such a foreign breach.

"Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing," the GOP presidential nominee said at a news conference in Miami on Wednesday. "I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press."

The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

A contentious scene unraveled here Tuesday morning at a meeting of Texas delegates after one criticized Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee and a favorite of Lone Star State Democrats.

Donald Trump laid out his plan for the economy, criticizing globalization and policies that promote free trade, in a speech in Monessen, Pa., on Tuesday.

NPR's politics team has annotated Trump's speech. The portions we commented on are bolded, followed by analysis and fact check in italics. We will update further.

The speech follows:

The House Benghazi Committee has released its findings on the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Libya.

The 800-page report found that despite President Obama and then Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's "clear orders," the military failed to immediately send a force to Benghazi and that nothing was en route to Libya at the time the last two Americans were killed — almost eight hours after the attacks began.

Michael Stravato and Shelby Tauber / Texas Tribune

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump leads Democratic rival Hillary Clinton by 8 percentage points in Texas, according to a University of Texas/Texas Politics Project Poll released Monday.

Trump is ahead of Clinton 41 percent to 33 percent in a head-to-head matchup, the poll found. Nineteen percent indicated support for "someone else," and 8 percent said they "haven't thought about it enough to have an opinion."


Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Around this time last year, it appeared that Texas would play an outsized role in the 2016 race for the White House. A Texas senator was in the running, as well as a scion of a Texas political dynasty, a former business executive with Austin roots, the libertarian-leaning son of a longtime Texas congressman, and the longest-serving Texas governor in state history.

Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A political analyst outlines three aspects of LBJ's campaign in 1964 against Republican nominee Barry Goldwater that could easily apply to Clinton's coming campaign against Trump.

 


Photo illustration by Todd Wiseman/TexasTribune

Presidential candidates have primaries in two more states this week before turning their full attention to the hundreds of delegates up for grabs on the March 1 Super Tuesday primaries, but what's at stake in the Texas primaries?

Republicans head to Nevada tomorrow. Then, their thoughts and money turn to the South.

Texas Sen.Ted Cruz had hoped South Carolina would be the state that cemented his place as a front-runner after winning the Iowa caucuses.

Finally, after more than 10 months of campaigning from more than a dozen presidential candidates, voters get to weigh in. Iowa Republicans and Democrats will caucus Monday night, and the results could at long last provide some clarity to the Republican and Democratic nominating contests — or not.

Here are five things we're watching:

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

Voters in primary states begin casting ballots for a new president starting next week.   

So far, many of the presidential front-runners owe their success to their ability to appeal to voter frustration and anger, but other voters say the negative feelings fueling this year’s election are an even bigger concern.

Photo via Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

There are only nine days left until decision day in Iowa. It’s the first shot that will set the stage for the rest of the presidential nominating process.

On the Republican side, the U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz is still within striking distance of the juggernaut that is Donald Trump. Although, a recent issues of the National Review has a roster of 22 major conservatives all coming out strongly against Trump.

 


Filipa Rodrigues, KUT News

More than 2,000 people came to the Long Center for a conversation with Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Clinton made Austin her 10th stop on her book tour promoting "Hard Choices," an autobiography covering a series of political events and crises  Clinton faced during her four years as Secretary of State.

The keynote address was full of lessons and accomplishments from Clinton's term. It mentioned her failures as well. 

The United States Senate voted today to confirm Sen. John Kerry as the next secretary of state.

Just five days ago, Kerry, a democratic senator from Massachusetts, testified before the committee he chaired. As NPR's Michele Kelemen reported at the time, the hearing was a love fest.

Kerry is decorated Vietnam war veteran and the son of a diplomat. He has served in the Senate since 1985.

Update at 3:30 p.m. ET. Clinton Testifies Before House Committee:

One of the defining moments of Hillary Clinton's tenure as secretary of state was her strong advocacy for U.S. military intervention that helped oust Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi in 2011.

But as she prepared to step down from the post, she faced a grilling from Republicans in both the House and the Senate over what went wrong in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11, 2012, when four Americans were killed, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

After nearly a month of health problems that culminated with a stay in a New York City hospital for treatment of a blood clot in a vein between her brain and her skull, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was back in her office Monday morning.

The State Department released a photo of the 65-year-old, soon-to-be-retired Clinton chairing a weekly meeting of assistant secretaries.

Pages