health care

Courtesy of Integral Care

Kerstin Taylor’s home is evidence of a life rebuilt. It’s filled with her grandmother’s paintings, Christian crosses, photos and stuffed animals.

“They all have names,” she said in reference to those stuffed animals. “That has to do with, truly, the family I never had – my broken family.”

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

There is yet another health care funding crisis before Congress.

After months of concern from advocates and families, lawmakers approved long-term funding two weeks ago for the Children’s Health Insurance Program. They didn’t do the same, however, for the country’s federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), which provide health care to low-income people.  The program is set to lose funding in March.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Open enrollment for health plans through the Affordable Care Act starts Nov. 1. But, this year, cutbacks in federal money for outreach efforts for potential enrollees could mean fewer people signing up for health insurance in Texas.

That gap in federal outreach means the work of getting people signed up could fall squarely on local advocates like Vitoria Ortega of Foundation Communities.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Graham-Cassidy, the latest Republican health care bill, would take all the money for Obamacare programs and redistribute it to states through a block grant program. That means states would get to decide how the money gets spent.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Republicans in Congress are pushing yet another plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and Texas, at first glance, looks like one of the big beneficiaries in the short term.

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