Health and Human Services

CSIS

From Texas Standard:

The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals is hearing arguments Monday in Seattle on whether President Donald Trump’s revised travel ban is a form of religious discrimination. The revised order limits travel from six, instead of seven Middle Eastern countries. Iraq is no longer included on the list thanks to the efforts of Stuart W. Bowen Jr., the former inspector general for the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC).

CSIS

Texas’ top health care fraud investigator resigned Wednesday night under pressure from the governor, the result of media inquiries that revealed Texas Health and Human Services Inspector General Stuart Bowen was moonlighting for a private firm that provided services for the government of Iraq.

AnToonz/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It all started with a battle over information: In one corner was the Texas Health and Human Services Commission. In the other were Texas lawmakers.

The commission holds the details of the state’s Medicaid contracts with large pharmaceutical companies, which show how much the state is spending on medicine. The commission assured lawmakers the state is getting a good deal, but the legislators wanted to see for themselves. In particular, they wanted to know the amount the state was getting back in rebates for name-brand medicine.

 


Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Three people have become infected with Shigella bacteria after swimming at Bull Creek Park, prompting the Austin/Travis County Health department to advise people to stay out of the creek. Dr. Phillip Huang, the Health Department’s Medical Director, said:

“There’s always a risk when you’re swimming in any of these natural bodies of water, so we always have the recommendation that people swim at their own risk. What we’ve identified is that we just received three reports of Shigella infection that are linked to sort of exposure at the Bull Creek Park in particular.”

mirsasha via flickr

For more than a century, the Austin State Hospital has been a fixture in Hyde Park. While the facility near Guadalupe and 41st Streets is primarily a psychiatric hospital, its winding trails and tree-lined campus are a popular recreational space for neighbors. Now, state leaders are considering selling the property and relocating the hospital – a move that has some residents concerned. 

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