Harry Ransom Center

© Inge Morath/Magnum Photos. Arthur Miller Papers, Harry Ransom Center.

From Texas Standard.

Playwright Arthur Miller is probably best known for “Death of a Salesman” or “The Crucible.” The Pulitzer Prize-winning dramatist spent most of his life on the east coast. But when it came to manuscripts and working notes for his plays, Miller gave the first boxes of his papers to the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin, back in the 60s. Now, the research library and museum has acquired more of his archive.

Pete Smith / Courtesy Harry Ransom Center

The archives from the hit cable series "Mad Men" is headed to UT-Austin's Harry Ransom Center.

The collection includes script drafts, props, costumes and video used in the production of the show. The donation was made by the series' creator and executive producer, Matthew Weiner, and the show's production company, Lionsgate.  

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News

A globe-trotting Frida Kahlo portrait, once displayed in Austin, has returned to its former home.

The painting, “Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird,” was on display in Austin until 1990, when it left to travel the world. It bounced around the globe for 25 years, and was featured in exhibitions in Spain, Australia, Canada, and most recently in New York. But now, this self-portrait of the distinctive artist is back at UT Austin’s Harry Ransom Center, where it will remain for the next two years.

Ransom Center via YouTube

The archives of Gabriel García Márquez, the Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist, are now open to the public and they’re located here in the capital city, at the University of Texas at Austin's Harry Ransom Center.

Harry Ransom Center

Nobel Prize winning Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez died earlier this year, but documents belonging to the literary giant will soon live on at the Harry Ransom Center on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin.

The materials include literary works with hand written corrections, a number of his computers, more than 2,000 pieces of correspondence and even the manuscript of his final unpublished novel.