NOAA/Wikimedia Commons (Public domain)

From Texas Standard.

A national marine sanctuary located about a hundred miles off the coast of Galveston is looking to expand its protection of coral reef habitats in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary is currently made up of three coral reef systems – deemed some of the healthiest during a time when many reefs around the world have been seriously damaged or are under threat.

Galveston Bay Dolphin Research and Conservation Program

From Texas Standard.

Much debris has been cleared out, but three months after Harvey’s landfall, the ecological damage is still being assessed. Not long after the storm clouds cleared, oyster and shrimp farmers lamented the hit to their livelihoods from extensive rains and runoff.

But researchers at the University of Houston at Clear Lake have been looking at the storm’s effect on other marine life, too – and they’ve discovered that bottlenose dolphins, have developed some puzzling ailments after the storm. Kristi Fazioli, a research associate with the Environmental Institute of Houston at the University of Houston Clear Lake, helps study this population.

Random House

Galveston Island is famous for many things: miles of beaches, its many festivals and Victorian architecture – and its sea wall – that was built after the hurricane of 1900. That was the deadliest hurricane in US history – and it rewrote the history of Galveston.

Texas author Elizabeth Black has set that famous hurricane at the center of a mystery in her first novel, “The Drowning House." Just as Galveston’s modern history is built on the foundation of the great hurricane, so is the narrative, set moodily in the city’s historic district. 

Moody Gardens

It’s considered to be the world’s largest and most foul smelling flower, and for the fourth time in history, one is blooming in Texas. The Corpse Flower, aka Amorphophallus titanum, began blooming yesterday at the Moody Gardens in Galveston.

“She started cranking out her stench and we compared it to a pile of dead rats,” said Donita Brannon, the horticultural exhibits manager of the Rainforest Pyramid at Moody Gardens. “It was pretty bad.”

The plant’s unusual look and scent has been attracting visitors to the Moody Gardens. “It’s been steady but not unbearable,” Brannon said.

Photo by KUT News

While Texans eagerly await any and all rain from tropical storm Don, one gulf city continues the work of rebuilding after Hurricane Ike.

The Galveston City Council narrowly dismissed a resolution Thursday to rebuild 569 public housing units off the island, The Galveston County Daily News reports.