Food

Mike/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

We often talk about our favorite barbecue joints in Texas, but of all the characteristics we use to label our favorites, we're hard pressed to mention one without a closed sign.

But Sonny Bryan’s 24-hour smokehouse in Dallas changed their hours in May.

Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn says the now round-the-clock barbecue joint used to have hours more typical of famed barbecue joints.

 


'The Tacos of Texas' is the Ultimate Taco Road Trip

Sep 15, 2016
Twitter/ElMundoDeMando

From Texas Standard:

In a state where the taco reigns supreme, it was inevitable that someone would write the be-all, end-all book on the subject.

That’s exactly what taco journalists Armando Rayo and Jarod Neece have done. The two taco-lovers embarked on a journey across 10 cities in Texas to find the best, the worst and the weirdest tacos for their new book, The Tacos of Texas.

 


Your Hottest Takes on That Hatch Chile Story

Aug 26, 2016
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

In the latest installment of our ATXplained series, KUT's Kate McGee tackled the grocer-backed frenzy surrounding the Hatch chile pepper. It's a time when the flavor of the beloved New Mexican pepper infiltrates seemingly any and all sundries.

For every obvious flavor combo, like chips or salsa or tortilla soup, there are seemingly dozens of other, more questionable fusions – Hatch pancake mix, Hatch beer, Hatch poundcake, Hatch wine, Hatch cookies and the like. 

Kate's story sought to answer the question of how festivals like Central Market's Hatch-A-Palooza sprouted up, and the answer to that question – and the revelation that Hatch chiles are virtually identical to counterparts like the Anaheim – was unsavory to some.

Things got heated.

So, here's a smattering of responses, compliments and hot takes we got online.

ICCNS/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Marla Torrado and Felipa Puente are taking a tour of a Texaco station in the Dove Springs community of Austin. The predominantly low-income neighborhood is a far cry from downtown’s flagship Whole Foods Market and the city’s most Instagrammed restaurants. Dove Springs is situated in the southeast part of the city. To social scientists it’s a well-known food desert. There are few restaurants – mostly fast food – and just one large grocery store on the neighborhood’s edge, that’s difficult to reach without a car.

But residents like Torrado and Puente are leading a movement to bring healthy food to every corner – or corner store. The store owner is showing them some of the healthier food items that need restocking: bags of brown rice, dried beans, and whole grain cereal.

Torrado is the local food retail organizer for the Healthy Corner Store Initiative. Go Austin Vamos Austin, or GAVA, is spearheading the effort – it’s a grassroots coalition of nonprofits and community members.

 


Which Texas Taco Town is Most Improved?

Aug 18, 2016
Gus Contreras / KERA News

From Texas Standard:

In a state where taco is king, assertions of a town's taco superiority are fightin' words, as past events have shown us.

So claiming one specific town is "most improved" is a risky move. But taco journalists Mando Rayo and Jarod Neece say one Texas city deserves that honor. In fact, one of the city's establishments was just named one of the best in the nation.


Why Commercial Venison Sales Are Banned in Texas

Aug 12, 2016
huntingdesigns/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

If you want a taste of white-tail deer in Texas, your best bet is to go out and shoot one, because you can't buy it at the grocery store.

Topo Chico is Bubbling Up Into the Mainstream

Jul 7, 2016
Flickr/Katie Spence (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It’s early on a June Friday evening in Austin. Bar manager Mark Yawn is carrying a large case of Topo Chico into the bar area of a buzzy downtown Austin restaurant. He’s preparing for the evening rush.

On a hot day in Texas, many reach for a cold bottle of water. Some think that water is best when bubbly. And for many connoisseurs of that bubbly water – there's nothing better than a Topo Chico. It’s one of the restaurant’s most popular non-alcoholic beverages.

Photo via Flickr/carlos-pacheco (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Cowboys, longhorns, barbecue – all part of the state's identity. But before barbecue became part of the legend, there was the original. But where was the original, exactly?

Where there’s smoke there’s Daniel Vaughn, barbecue editor for Texas Monthly. His research revealed what could conceivably be the first barbecue joint in Texas was born not too far from Lockhart, the town largely considered to be a barbecue mecca in the state.


Flickr/Carol Martinez (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Texas takes its food seriously – consider the breakfast taco war between San Antonio and Austin just a few weeks ago.

It's no wonder advertisers are keen to target Texans. Even the behemoth fast food chain McDonald's is trying to get an edge in the Lone Star State. McDonald's is currently baiting Texans to create the first official McDonald's "Texas burger." What is a Texas burger exactly? Dallas Morning News restaurant critic Leslie Brenner gave the burger builder a try, but she said some crucial ingredients were missing.

 


Flickr/Wally Gobetz (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It's been said that if you want an introduction to Texas barbecue, you should hit the Texas barbecue trail. It's a track that takes you from Taylor to Elgin to Lockhart, and finally ends in Luling.

But really, that's just central Texas. As most of you know, there's a whole lot more of Texas to taste – like the southeast corner of Texas, where beef links trump brisket.

 


Image via flickr/greenplasticamy (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Mexicans consume more carbonated drinks per person than any other nation in the world, at an average of 36 gallons a year according to experts. That's 40 percent more than the average American.

Why Barbecue Homogenization is a Good Thing

Feb 4, 2016
Photo via Flickr/wallyg (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Barbecue in the U.S. comes in all shapes and sizes. The multiple variations of sauces, cuts of meats, and rubs provide a distinction between certain regional styles of the dish. Or do they? 

Image via Twitter/TiffsTreats

From Texas Standard:

When you think about childhood, many think of the cool feel of your skin in the rain, the flickering candles on your birthday cake and the warm bite of freshly baked cookie.

Image via Flickr/Phil Darnell (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

We’ve got some great news for you shellfish lovers out there – mudbug season has begun! Not quite yet, but thanks to unseasonably warm temperatures, delicious crawfish have made their way into restaurants and markets across Southeast Texas.

Laura Taylor https://flic.kr/p/4Vhnsb

For advice on how to get the tastes of Texas on your plate and in your glass, we speak with Edible Austin publisher Marla Camp and Texas Monthly drinks columnist Jessica Dupuy.

    

Image via Flickr/Adam Barhan (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

If you attended the Texas Craft Brewers festival earlier this year, you saw the work of more than 60 of those craft brewers. It was an opportunity for these breweries to get their brands and their beers in front of the drinking public because many haven’t been around for very long.

Here's An Apple Pie Recipe For Any Texan Holiday

Dec 16, 2015
Image via Flickr/Steven Depolo (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Every Christmas my mom would bake eight pies: four apple and four pecan. Now, we wouldn’t eat all of those ourselves. Two would be given away to pie-less people and two would be placed in the deep freeze for some emergency of the future. Pies and money were similar in my mom’s mind. Save a fourth of everything in deep savings for some future need.

When baking these pies, she had a quite a memorable ritual she followed.

 


mrjoro/flickr

This is a story of two nuts: the almond and the pecan. 

In the 1960s the pecan industry loomed large over the almond. But, then, something changed. Since then, the almond crop has seen a nearly 33-fold growth, while the pecan crop has seen little to no growth. But things are looking up for the once-proud pecan.


flickr/mydailymorsel

Researchers are in Austin this week for the International Conference on Neural Tube Defects. It coincides with the 25th anniversary of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act — a law that led to the U.S. government acknowledging a link between folic acid deficiency during pregnancy and neural tube defects, like spina bifida.

The law also led to mandatory enrichment of certain foods with folic acid, but not all foods — particularly, tortillas. 


Image via Pixabay/tookapic (CC0 Public Domain)

From Texas Standard: 

The World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer announced yesterday that processed meats are "carcinogenic to humans," meaning their consumption can cause cancer.


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