Joy Diaz, KUT News

Update: The Heart Gallery of Central Texas is on display at Austin City Hall through tomorrow.

Original story (Aug. 29): Think about adoption, and you’re probably thinking about babies.

That's one of the reasons why older children struggle to get adopted. Two other groups that have a hard time finding their "forever homes" are children with disabilities and sibling groups – about half of the children in foster care who are waiting to be adopted are groups of siblings.

It's a moment many parents dread — sitting down to talk with their kid about drugs. What should they say? Will the conversation have any effect? And should they mention their own youthful indiscretions?

Parents can get advice from the family doctor or pediatrician and places like the Partnership at Drugfree.org (formerly the Partnership for a Drug-Free America), though there's not been much evidence to back up the recommendations.


There used to be a stigma attached to living at home into one’s twenties and thirties – but not so much these days.

Blame it on rising housing prices, or dwindling employment opportunities for grads – but nowadays, young adults between the ages of 25 to 34 are feeling more comfortable about moving back in with their parents.

According to a recent Pew Research Center report on the so-called “boomerang generation,” three out of 10 young adults have moved back home in recent years, thanks to a weak economy. 

The good news concerning multi-generational households is that it looks like all parties are benefiting from the trend. Of the 2,048 adults surveyed nationwide, 48 percent have reported paying rent to their parents and 89 percent say they help with household expenses, like utilities.