For a company that's all about the future of communication, Facebook is looking to the past to solve at least some of its problems.

After months of intense scrutiny over the role the company played in the 2016 presidential election, the social network giant announced it wants to use postcards to verify the identity of advertising buyers to prevent future foreign meddling.

Update (Dec. 12) – Commissioner Miller joined Chad Hasty of KFYO in Lubbock to discuss both the Tribune's analysis of his Facebook activity and KUT's interview with him last week and to offer some criticism of KUT's interview with him last week.

As with most interviews aired on KUT, our interview with Commissioner Miller was edited to fit our news magazine program. Our 16 minute interview with Miller was edited down to about eight minutes, which is close to our maximum length for an interview during All Things Considered.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

The Election Day win of President-elect Donald Trump has left pollsters, journalists and many others looking for lessons learned. Among the men and women who prepare tomorrow’s journalists, there is also some soul-searching. Many are looking to recalibrate.

Editor's Note: This story contains images and language that some readers may find disturbing.

Mark Zuckerberg — one of the most insightful, adept leaders in the business world — has a problem. It's a problem he has been slow to acknowledge, even though it's become more apparent by the day.

Spencer Selvidge / KUT

In the photo, a curly-haired woman stares into the camera wearing a red lifeguard bathing suit, holding a long, red rectangular flotation device over her shoulder.