environment

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

At the corner of 16th and Salinas streets, Leticia Hurtado and Yolanda Lopez are on the sidewalk formulating their plan of attack. The pecan tree they’re standing under has good nuts, but many of them are too far up in the branches to reach.

Daniel Plumer/flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A Midland man was stung over 50 times and his dogs died after being stung over 1,000 times. In Texarkana, a swarm of bees surrounded a woman's car, trapping her inside. A man mowing his lawn in Raymondville was swarmed, suffered more than 200 stings, and died. A farmer in Lozano died after being stung more than 3,000 times.

These are no ordinary bees. Entomologists call them killer bees, or Africanized bees – a hybrid of two species, the African honey bee and various European cousins. They look like European honey bees, stripes and all, but are smaller. And their impulse to sting is 10 times greater – bees will pursue victims as far as half of a mile away from hives.


Miguel Guitierrez Jr./KUT

When a lot of people suddenly notice the same thing at the same time, it might be worth looking into. This year in Central Texas that's what's happening with fireflies. There is an unusually large number of them lighting up the early evening, and people are wondering why. 


flickr.com/mrgarin

Austin’s seen its first triple-digit day of the summer. Just before 1 p.m. yesterday, Central Texas thermometers cracked the triple-digit seal, according to the National Weather Service. While the thermostat has thankfully stayed pretty low so far this year in Austin, that’s going to change.

When it comes to triple-digit days in Austin, the best way to describe what’s happening is, “Never would’ve been better than late.”

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Kenner Rogers, Founder and President of Keymel Technologies, LLC.

Rogers, a New Orleans native grew up with a passion for gardening, which later evolved into his love for Science, Metrology and Environmental studies. He often reflects on a commercial that depicted a Native American Indian dishearten by once a pristine landscape that became desolate and defiled due to pollution.

That commercial left a profound impact on him, which resulted in the development of a philosophy that, “respect what Mother Nature has provided, and preserve what God has given for future generations,” he says. This philosophy along with the “going green” movement ignited him to seek business opportunities in the field.

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