el paso

Natalie Krebs

From Texas Standard.

On a recent chilly Friday night at Fort Davis ISD’s football field, the stands are nearly empty. No more than a half-dozen parents sat in the visitors section at the rural west Texas school to cheer their team: the El Paso Christian Home School Panthers.

Ruben R. Ramirez/El Paso Times

From Texas Standard:

For the majority of the past three decades, most recently at the helm of the El Paso Times, newspaperman Bob Moore has shaken things up. And for those who do not believe in government transparency, his bite has proven worse than his roar.

Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

From Texas Standard:

Have you voted yet? We're looking at you Pasadena, and you, El Paso, and you, too, San Antonio. Tomorrow there are runoff elections in all three cities. And in each city, the top job in city government is at stake.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News

Wake up, get dressed, pack your homework, maybe a lunch. That’s the typical morning routine for most students. But some students on the U.S.-Mexico border grab something else on their way out the door — their passports.

 

Nineteen-year-old Arlet Burciaga is one of those students.


Ivan Pierre Aguirre for Texas Tribune

EL PASO — The flowers that decorate offices, homes and restaurants along the Mexico border have been inspected as closely at border crossings as many door panels and car trunks, well-known hiding places used by drug mules to export heroin, cocaine and marijuana.

In the weeks before Valentine’s Day, flower shipments passing through Mexico and into the United States have surged. But nestled in those floral arrangements may be tiny pests and diseases that can wreak havoc with domestic plants in the United States. The job of preventing those pests from entering the country falls to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents who inspect all plants that pass through the border crossings in Texas and elsewhere.

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