el nino

Energy & Environment
10:18 am
Fri December 5, 2014

If El Nino Ever Arrives, It Likely Wont Bring Much Rain

El Nino heats up parts of the ocean, and begins a pattern that can bring rain to North America.
NOAA

The Climate Prediction Center is out with an update on El Nino.  The weather pattern is often associated with heavy rains, so watching for its arrival has become something of an obsession in drought-stricken parts of the country like Texas.

Read more
Energy & Environment
12:11 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

Fewer Atlantic Hurricanes Hint at Summer's Continuously Elusive El Niño

Hurricane Sandy, pictured, churns off the east coast on October 28, 2012 in the Atlantic Ocean.
NASA, via Getty Images

From StateImpact Texas:

There’s a good chance of an El Niño weather pattern forming by the end of the year. That could be good for easing or even ending the Texas drought. But it’s not a sure thing.

Read more
Energy & Environment
12:35 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

El Nino Flies Under the Radar in Summer, But Could It Still Bring a Wetter Texas Winter?

El Nino hasn't brought the wet summer promised by some meteorologists, but it could bring Texas rains this fall and winter.
Huma Munir/KUT News

Earlier this year Lower Colorado River Authority meteorologist Bob Rose, liked what he was seeing in the forecast.  

“I’m optimistic that we will get into a pattern of above normal rainfall this fall continuing into next winter and possibly into next spring as well,” he said in April.

Bur since this April things changed.

After much ado, the El Nino predicted by many meteorologists hasn’t quite showed itself in the form rainfall yet. While there’s still a chance it could strengthen before the summer’s end, it’s not likely it will meet its initial forecasted fury. 

Read more
Energy & Environment
10:37 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Could 2014 Be A Drought Buster For Texas?

An empty rain gauge is strapped to a fence post on the edge of a pasture this summer near Canadian, Texas.
Scott Olsen, Getty Images

From StateImpact Texas: 

In Spanish, El Niño means “the boy child.” But if El Niño predictions for late 2014 prove correct, winter rainfall in Texas could be anything but little.  The deceptively-named weather pattern generally brings rain. Lots of it.

El Niño occurs when warm water buried below the surface of the Pacific rises up and spreads along the equator towards America. It often causes storms that devastate parts of Latin America, Indonesia and Australia, but it could also bring relief to drought-stricken Texas.

Read more
weather
2:17 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

El Niño More Likely To Return This Summer

Surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean. El Niño creates unusually warm temperatures in the equatorial Pacific.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A weather pattern that could bring cooler temperatures and more rain to Texas is likely to develop this month or next, according to climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

“There is increased confidence for a weak-to-moderate El Niño during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter 2012-13,” NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center said. “El Niño conditions are likely to develop during August or September 2012.” In June, NOAA predicted only a 50 percent likelihood that El Niño would return in the second half of the year. El Niño creates unusually warm temperatures in the equatorial Pacific.

NOAA also updated its summer hurricane forecast today, suggesting we may have a “busy second half” of hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin. They expect 12 to 17 tropical storms by November, including five to eight hurricanes, of which two to three could strengthen into major hurricanes. Tropical Storm Ernesto is currently spinning in the Gulf of Mexico and headed to a flood-prone inland area in the Los Tuxtlas region of Mexico, the AP reports. 

As StateImpact Texas points out, Texas needs just the right kind of storms, moist enough to drench the dry zones, but not powerful enough to erode the coastline, which is currently receding at an average rate of six feet per year