Education

Banspy/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Some of America’s biggest school districts in New York City, Chicago, Miami-Dade County and Houston are hiring more security officers and police than counselors. In Houston, for example, there is only one counselor for every 1,175 students.

Policy and research editor Matt Barnum, from a nonpartisan news website focusing on education issues called The 74,  looked at the data.


Flickr/Jin (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Maybe you’ve heard Texas Rep. Pete Sessions wants magic to be recognized as an official national treasure – the proposal made headlines, many of them a little snarky. But how could magic solve some of the state’s most pressing needs?

Miguel Guitierrez Jr./KUT

Austin ISD and local charter school students got a chance to pitch innovative learning projects to a group of judges and experts this week as part of SXSWedu. Winners were awarded money to jumpstart their projects that focus on everything from gaming to equitable water access.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

The Austin Independent School District is giving more North Austin students an opportunity to take science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) courses. AISD unveiled Tuesday the Applied Technology Center at Anderson High School, and high school students from across North Austin will have access to the facility.

The new center has different rooms where students can take engineering, manufacturing and computer science classes. 


KUT KUTX Belo Media
KUT News

After months of serving as interim dean, the Moody College of Communication announced Monday that Jay Bernhardt would continue on as the head of the school.

Bernhardt has been at the helm of the college since September of 2015, after long-time Dean Roderick Hart stepped down last August. In a statement announcing the confirmation, UT President Greg Fenves said Bernhardt was chosen after a months-long search. His appointment begins March 1.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Robert L. Reece, doctoral candidate at Duke University and Heather A. O’Connell, postdoctoral fellow at Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, co-authors of a Rice University study, “How the Legacy of Slavery and Racial Composition Shape Public School Enrollment in the American South.”

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

The Texas Lottery Commission says, since 1992, it has put $24 billion toward state programs – primarily education.
With tonight’s Powerball jackpot up to a record $1.5 billion, let’s take a look at whether that means more money for public schools.


On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with late Dr. John Hope Franklin, Ph.D.

Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

The number of investigations involving teacher-student relationships has increased 53 percent in Texas over the past seven years—188 cases so far this year. The State Senate Education Committee met this week to discuss ways to reduce these relationships, but that may be tougher than they realized.


Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Weeks after a Houston-area mother sparked an uproar over a caption in her son’s textbook that inaccurately described African slaves as “workers,” the State Board of Education tentatively approved several changes to its textbook adoption process.


YouTube/gabinchis

When Gene and Shirene McIntyre met with an attendance officer in the El Paso Independent School District in November 2006, their nine grandchildren had already been homeschooled for more than a year. But they were concerned the kids weren’t getting a proper education.

According to court documents, the children were always playing instruments and singing — nothing like traditional school. The children's uncle testified that one child said they did not have to do schoolwork because their parents, Laura and Michael, told them they were “going to be raptured.” 


Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News

Demetrius Hardison and Israel Uballe are warming up for their guitar lesson.

This summer, Hardison and Uballe are the only two students taking guitar here. But during the school year, there are two sections of guitar lessons with four to six students each. Students can earn academic credit for taking the lessons, which take place twice a week during the school year. 

Jeremy Osborn, a teacher from the Austin Classical Guitar Society, leads the boys through their warm-ups. 

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Daron K. Roberts, former NFL coach and founding director of the Center for Sports Leadership & Innovation at the University of Texas. Roberts also serves as a lecturer in the Liberal Arts Honors program where he teaches courses on sports leadership and innovation.

Flickr/cleopold73 (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Just in time for the start of school, The New York Times reports that there’s a shortage of teachers. Across the country, school districts have gone from refusing to renew contracts to scrambling to hire teachers. This shortage is seen particularly in math, science and special education, and it's a result of the layoffs from the recession years, as well as an improving economy in which fewer people are training to be teachers.

The issue is so critical that some systems are allowing new hires to train on the job and bringing in people who are still finishing their teaching credentials. According to the Times, the situation is most critical in Louisville, Nashville, Oklahoma City and Providence. However, Texas also fares low.

Dr. Steve Perry: Revolutionizing Education in America

Jul 29, 2015

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Steve Perry, Founder and Principal of the Capital Preparatory Magnet School, located in Hartford, CT.

Photo via San Antonio Charter Moms/(CC BY 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

For more than 130 years, a mill has been a landmark of the Johnson City community. It’s served as a steam grist mill, cotton gin, feed mill and even a restaurant. But it was vacant for a while, until its latest tenant moved in: a science museum.

Photo via Flickr/ryantron (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

In a new report from the University of Texas at Tyler, a trio of researchers asked nearly 1,000 undergraduates to keep track of their time. And to keep track of what they were doing when they were also doing something else.

“We basically found that multitasking is somewhat of a myth. People think that they are able to do it, but they really are not able to do it well," Kouider Mokhtari says.

Mokhtari co-authored with Julie Delello and Carla Reichard. He says one of the surprising findings of their study is that students know multitasking doesn’t work – but they do it anyway – and so, admittedly, do most all of us.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

High school students from across Texas are spending the weekend launching rockets near Fredericksburg as a part of an aeroscience engineering program called SystemsGo.

The Willow City volunteer fire station just outside Fredericksburg filled up with high school students from all over Texas at 6 a.m. They bend over nearly 20 different rockets, prepping them for launch.

Students ask questions like: “So when the parachute comes out, where is the air resistance going to be? How is it going to catch air? Did we research that?”

One team of students traveled from Kingwood High School in the Humble Independent School District outside Houston. They’ve been working on their rocket for six months — even building part of it with 3D printers.

Nathan Bernier/KUT News

The Texas Senate is moving forward with a proposal to assign letter grades to Texas public schools.

Supporters say this bill would boost failing schools, while opponents say these grades will stigmatize schools and create more of a problem. 

State Sen. Larry Taylor, a Friendswood Republican, says his bill, SB 6, would empower parents. They’d have more information about how their children’s schools are doing once their school gets an A through F grade based on standardized test scores.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Daron K. Roberts, founding director of the Center for Sports Leadership and Innovation at The University of Texas at Austin. He also serves as a lecturer in the Liberal Arts Honors program.

Pages