east austin

Pavel Mezihorak for KUT

Austin has been called the most economically segregated city in the nation. Now, the Austin City Council is taking steps to try and bring more jobs to the East Side, an area that’s historically been home to minority populations and the economically disadvantaged.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

It’s lunchtime at the Quickie Pickie on East 11th Street. Customers fill the patio tables and several others line up to order food inside. Manager Mohammad Walid describes the business as part restaurant, part convenience store.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Danny Fowler stands in the middle of his driveway holding a vase full of red flowers.

He is taking them to his neighbor, who lives just across the street, over the crest of the steep hill that cuts this East Austin cul-de-sac in two. The street, which begins as E.M. Franklin Avenue before morphing into Grant Street, makes up Ebony Acres, a historically black neighborhood.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

In the neighborhood around 12th and Chicon streets in East Austin – a lot has changed – new homes, new businesses, new residents – but there are some things that have stayed the same.

As part of our On My Block series, KUT’s Lauren Hubbard brings us to Marshall’s Barbershop, a longtime fixture in the neighborhood that’s now one of the few black-owned businesses in the neighborhood.

Check out more stories in this project at our On My Block Tumblr

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

L.M. Rivers stared at the several black tiles he had glued onto the canvas. They colored one-third of what was to be a baseball cap. But Rivers was not so sure what to make of the face depicted beneath the baseball cap.

Courtesy of Julia Robinson

If the consensus from November’s elections was that the media is more disconnected from everyday Americans than anyone recognized, at least one branch of Austin’s media producers is pushing back: photographers.

YouTube/MixerrReviewsYT

Travis County Commissioners are considering throwing their support behind a preservation battle brewing in the Montopolis neighborhood of Southeast Austin.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

People grumble about how fast Austin is growing. But growth can also bring chances for creative collaboration. That’s what happened at Dozen Street bar near the corner of 12th and Chicon streets, when a musician from Philadelphia started hosting a regular Wednesday night session for fellow players.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Of the hundreds of artists and artisans opening their doors to the East Austin Studio Tour weekend, there’s one that’s been around for a while – one whose creations you might’ve seen before – Sertodo Copper.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News

Ambres Kearney’s muscle memory flares up every time he drives back to his East Austin alma mater, Anderson High School. As he pulls into the U-shaped parking lot, he instinctively tries to park his car in the same spot where he parked his 1963 burnt orange Chevrolet 45 years ago as a high school senior. 

“My wife said ‘Where are you going?’ But it was so natural to drive up,” Kearney says. Instead, he parks in the street and sits on the stoop at the front entrance. Parts of the concrete steps underneath him are crumbling.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

In the late morning hours on the Southeast corner of 12th and Chicon streets, a visitor sees a bus stop with a bench on the Chicon side. Behind that bus stop, an empty lot; way behind that, a small convenience store with a drive-thru window. And then, on the 12th Street side, Marshall’s Barbershop.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Aside from some passing traffic, the northeast corner of 12th and Chicon streets remains fairly quiet in the early morning hours.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

To the uninformed, Shonda Mace looked like she was being a real creep. On a morning last March, the young woman loitered in front of a home on East 22nd Street. She eyed the house in front of her before snapping two photos of it.


Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez / KUT

It's no secret that the African American population of East Austin has been dwindling as the white population has increased for the past couple of decades. But some see a bright spot in that transformation, and it's apparent on Sunday mornings at the Holy Cross Catholic Church.


Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin’s trolley cars, which retired in 1940, stopped at East 12th and Chicon streets. It’s there that Ada Harden and her brother would hop on, pay the five-cent fee, and ride with little concern about a destination.


East Austin Theater at the Center of Code Dispute

Aug 30, 2016
Megan K. Miller via Twitter

Austin’s Code Department is responsible for making sure land is used for its intended purpose. So what happens when those rules are broken? One East Austin theater is finding itself at the center of a code dispute.


Favor

The Austin-based delivery company Favor has doubled its service zone, and it now covers an area stretching from Cedar Park to Slaughter Lane. The app-based service delivers everything from tacos to dry cleaning for a flat $5 fee, plus driver tip, and boasts an average 35-minute arrival time.

Favor has grown to serve more affluent and suburban areas, but the tech firm still provides relatively limited service in the less wealthy, minority neighborhoods of East Austin, Southeast Austin and Northeast Austin. Much of its delivery zone east of I-35 serves the most rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

Rapid development is just about everywhere in Austin. Some of that development has brought up environmental questions, or concerns over the increased traffic they could bring. But one developer has a fight on their hands that's not about what’s happening above ground, but below.


Miguel Guitierrez Jr./KUT

City officials are in the process of surveying East Austin to determine which buildings qualify for historic preservation, but some residents want to put a stop to any demolition until that survey is complete.


Jorge Sanhueza Lyon/KUT

Jimmy Reed, 78, stands in front of his childhood home on East Austin’s Garden Street. It has been stripped to the 1920s wooden frame, and the barely 800-square-foot home looks more condemned than livable.


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