Lance Armstrong will not cooperate with a United States Anti-Doping Agency probe into doping in the cycling world.

Bloomberg reports Armstrong missed a deadline set by USADA today. Armstrong's lawyer said he would not cooperate because the probe was too narrow.

Bloomberg adds:

Lance Armstrong says a “full blown, global” Truth and Reconciliation Commission is the only way for cycling to move past doping scandals.

In his first interview since admitting to doping, Armstrong says cyclists need to be assured that there won’t be consequences if they share the truth.

Daniel Benson is the Managing Editor at He told KUT that to get the interview with Armstrong—all he had to do was ask.

The organization Lance Armstrong founded to help those battling cancer has dropped his name.

A media representative for the organization confirmed to KUT News that the Lance Armstrong Foundation is now officially the Livestrong Foundation—a name that many already knew it by.

The International Cycling Union (UCI) says no one will be named a winner for the seven years that Lance Armstrong finished first in the Tour de France.

The governing body of cycling is also calling on Armstrong and others accused of using performance-enhancing drugs to return the prize money they were awarded.

The UCI also announced today it will undergo an external review to determine whether it did enough to ensure Armstrong wasn’t doping.

Daniel Bayer,

This morning the governing body of cycling—the International Cycling Union (UCI)—agreed to strip Lance Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles.

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) banned Armstrong from sanctioned competition for life and moved to take away his titles but it was up to the UCI to make the final call.

The Associated Press reports that Christian Prudhomme, director of the Tour de France, has previously stated that the Tour will recognize any decision on Armstrong by the UCI.  Prudhomme stated that should the UCI decide to strip Armstrong of his titles, the Tour's record books will show no winner from 1999-2005.

Cyclist Lance Armstrong is stepping down from his role as chairman of the cancer-awareness charity Livestrong, the organization said in a press release today. (Update at 8:34 a.m. Separately, Nike dropped its sponsorship of Armstrong.)

Reactions to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's recently released report on cyclist Lance Armstrong's use of performance-enhancing drugs have ranged from denial to anger and disappointment. Some have said Armstrong merely did what it took to compete with pro racers, all of them chemically enhanced. But that's just not true, says Joe Lindsey, a contributor to Bicycling magazine.

Daniel Bayer,

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has released 202-pages of a report it is sending  to other athletic and cycling governing bodies today, Wednesday, Oct. 10 about Lance Armstrong's alleged doping. The report details what USADA says it's uncovered about the Austin cyclist’s use of performance enhancing drugs.

Armstrong has denied doping but stopped his legal fight against the charges in August. The International Cycling Union (UCI) will make the ultimate decision whether Armstrong will be banned from competition and stripped of his seven Tour de France titles.

In a statement about the report, USADA CEO Travis Tygart says the US Postal Service Pro Cycling Team that Armstrong was a part of ran the “most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.”

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

Lawyers for seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong argued for more than two hours in federal court in Austin Friday afternoon. But in lieu of a decision, Judge Sam Sparks gave both sides a week to submit final claims in the case.

The case should boil down to jurisdiction. Armstrong’s lawyers asked District Judge Sam Sparks for an injunction against the US Anti-Doping Agency, or USADA. The USADA claims that Armstrong was a part of a doping conspiracy that led to Tour de France victories between 1999 and 2005. They want to ban Armstrong from competition for life and take away his titles.

Armstrong has consistently denied doping. His lawyers claim that the International Cycling Union, or UCI, holds jurisdiction in this case. If any body is to charge Armstrong with doping, his attorneys argue, it would have to be the UCI.