Border

Borderlands
6:03 am
Wed March 26, 2014

From Pancho Villa To Panda Express: Life In A Border Town

Columbus, N.M., was raided by Pancho Villa in 1916 and by federal agents in 2011.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 10:12 am

Columbus, N.M., is all about the border. It's an official border crossing. Its history centers on a cross-border raid. In more recent years, it was a transit point for illegal weapons heading south into Mexico.

It's also the destination for children heading north to a U.S. school.

All the different strands of Columbus came together when we spent the day with the new mayor of the village. Phillip Skinner, former real estate developer and maquiladora owner-turned politician and school bus driver, was inaugurated early this month, on the morning we rolled into town.

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Borderlands
4:34 am
Mon March 24, 2014

On The Mend, But Wounds Of Violence Still Scar Juarez

Workers arrive at an assembly plant located along the border.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:25 am

We had just finished our time in Juarez, Mexico, when we had dinner with some distant relations on the U.S. side of the border. "You," one of my relatives said, "are the first Juarez survivors we've seen in some time."

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Borderlands
4:45 am
Thu March 20, 2014

At The Border, The Drugs Go North And The Cash Goes South

Many drug cartel members die young, and when they do, their families often spend lavishly to construct mausoleums that look like small condos.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 10:07 am

The international drug trade goes in two directions: Narcotics go north and money goes south. All the drug profits made on the streets of U.S. cities like Chicago and Atlanta and Dallas are funneled down to ports of entry on the U.S.-Mexico border where they're smuggled back into Mexico. In 2012, one federal agency alone, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, seized $411 million in cash hidden in vehicles, mostly heading south.

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Borderlands
4:22 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Border Patrol To Limit Use Of Deadly Force Against Rock Throwers

A Border Patrol agent looks to the north near where the border wall ends as it separates Tijuana, Mexico, left, and San Diego.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 3:17 pm

U.S. Border Patrol announced on Friday that it is changing its policy on using deadly force against moving vehicles and people who throw rocks.

The agency's chief, Michael J. Fisher, sent a memorandum to employees in which he said the policy is designed to help agents avoid dangerous situations.

This is an about-face for the agency.

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Border
11:22 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Why Texas Border Counties Aren't Prosecuting Some Drug Cases

http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkflip/6383917241/

Interview with G.W. Schulz of the Center for Investigative Reporting

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents are making so many drug busts near the border that local officials are struggling to pay for prosecuting them, the Center for Investigative Reporting found out. We spoke with CIR reporter G.W. Schulz about what they discovered in Hudspeth County, Texas.