In Black America

Cornell Marketing

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Noliwe Rooks, director of American Studies and associate professor of Africana Studies at Cornell University, and author of Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation and The End of Public Education.

Rooks talks about the making and unmaking of public education, corporate takeover of education, and school choice. 

Taylor Johnson

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Michael Hurd, director for the Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture at Prairie View A&M University and author of Thursday Night Lights: The Story of Black High School Football in Texas.

Hurd talks Prairie View Interscholastic League, black high school football in Texas, and the outstanding players who made their way into the National Football League and the black college and Pro Football Hall of Fame.

CSPAN screengrab

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents a tribute to screen and stage legends Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Davis died on Feb. 4, 2005. He was 87; Dee died on June 11, 2014 at 91.

Davis and Dee talk about their careers, the civil rights movement, race-conscious issues and family life.

ELVERT BARNES PROTEST PHOTOGRAPHY / FLICKR

In honor of comedian and human rights activist Dick Gregory, In Black America concludes an encore presentation of an interview and keynote address marking the 50th anniversary of the Sweatt v. Painter decision, which successfully challenged the "separate but equal" system of segregation.

The program originally aired in May 2000.

Gregory died on Aug. 19, 2017. He was 84.

Elvert Barnes Protest Photography / Flickr

In honor of comedian and human rights activist Dick Gregory, In Black America presents an encore presentation of an interview and keynote address marking the 50th anniversary of the Sweatt v. Painter decision, which successfully challenged the "separate but equal" system of segregation.

The program originally aired in May 2000.

Gregory died on Aug. 19, 2017. He was 84.

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