barbecue

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

By now, most Texans are familiar with Sid Miller. Famous for his ever-present cowboy hat, the state agriculture commissioner – who's also a rancher and a Republican – has generated his share of controversy in recent months. But this week he's making news on his own terms with a commentary written for TribTalk, the editorial wing of the Texas Tribune.

Mike/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

We often talk about our favorite barbecue joints in Texas, but of all the characteristics we use to label our favorites, we're hard pressed to mention one without a closed sign.

But Sonny Bryan’s 24-hour smokehouse in Dallas changed their hours in May.

Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn says the now round-the-clock barbecue joint used to have hours more typical of famed barbecue joints.

 


Photo via Flickr/carlos-pacheco (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Cowboys, longhorns, barbecue – all part of the state's identity. But before barbecue became part of the legend, there was the original. But where was the original, exactly?

Where there’s smoke there’s Daniel Vaughn, barbecue editor for Texas Monthly. His research revealed what could conceivably be the first barbecue joint in Texas was born not too far from Lockhart, the town largely considered to be a barbecue mecca in the state.


Image via Flickr/David Boté Estrada (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Anyone who eats barbecue in Texas has been there: stand in line, order your meat – meat that many have raised to an art if not a religion. When the meal is slapped on the counter, you get this question: bread or crackers? There's an option that rarely comes up in barbecue joints: tortillas.

Where there’s smoke, there’s Daniel Vaughn, Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor. He points out that there’ve been tortillas in Texas for centuries so why aren’t they on the 'cue menu?

 


Image via Flickr/John Marshall (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

Texas barbecue, like Texas itself, has many origins. There's the Mexican influence, which you can taste when you bite into a juicy barbacoa taco, and then there's the influence of Germans and Czechs who brought the idea of meat shops and cooking meat over hot coals to the Lone Star State.

What really helped shape our idea of barbecue isn't nearly as well documented or celebrated: the influence of slave populations and their style of cooking.

Where there's smoke, there's Daniel Vaughn. The Texas Monthly barbecue editor stepped in to the Standard's studio to tell us more.

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