Austin

News, events, and entertainment happening in and around Austin and the Central Texas counties of Travis, Hays, Caldwell, Bastrop and Williamson

Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

An Austin-based nonprofit that helps people sign up for health insurance is teaming up with another group that helps musicians access low-cost medical care. Foundation Communities will work with the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians, or HAAM, to get more Austin musicians insured during the upcoming enrollment period for plans on the federal marketplace.


NWS San Antonio/twitter

11:00 a.m.: The Austin Independent School District has announced classes are canceled Monday, November 2, at Palm Elementary because some classrooms in the school sustained heavy water damage during the storm.  Faculty and staff should report to campus Monday. Two parent meetings will be held Monday to provide more information.

Trey Shaar/KUT

A federal judge has dismissed a manslaughter charge against former Austin Police Detective Charles Kleinert in the death of Larry Eugene Jackson, Jr.

Kleinert, who's white, shot Jackson, an African-American, following a foot pursuit and a scuffle after Jackson approached the scene of a bank robbery in Central Austin on July 26, 2013.

Some Austin City Council members will be up for reelection next year. That means they can start raising campaign money in May 2016.

Council members have already started talking about how to make that process more transparent – along with something else that influences city policy.

flickr/wallyg

An Austin City Council committee is recommending that Barton Springs Pool waive admissions fees for a select group of residents: those 80 years and older.

Though it was free for them before — sort of.


Travis County is working towards using a federal system that verifies the immigration status of those applying to work for the county. But County Commissioners have a few reservations.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

This week, Austin City Council members will reignite a discussion their predecessors started three years ago.

Council will look at the question of whether the city should have a policy to help renters who are forced to move through no fault of their own.


Remember When Bacon Was Actually Good for Us?

Oct 26, 2015
cookbookman17/flickr

Today, the World Health Organization dropped a bombshell on bacon lovers. The organization revealed the results of its years-long study, which suggests processed meats increase the likelihood of colorectal cancer. Sure, it’s not exactly a huge surprise – studies on processed meats were found to increase the risk of diabetes in 2013, and a 2012 study found eating too much meat increased the overall risk of early death by 20 percent.

But, in a less learned time of Texas’ history, bacon was considered a cure-all for all sorts of maladies.

Scott Tucker/Flickr

Formula One at Circuit of the Americas, or COTA, has now wrapped up. But one thing that still has yet to conclude: a lawsuit COTA filed against the Travis County Appraisal District in 2013.


YouTube/MigoChannel

It’s not often an international champion is crowned in Austin. Formula One did just that, awarding it World Drivers’ Championship to Lewis Hamilton. But, the most difficult opponent all weekend may have been the rain.


Gabriel Cristóver Pérez

We’re in the middle of festival season in Austin. On the heels of the Austin City Limits Music Festival, Fun Fun Fun Fest is coming up in less than two weeks. Both events are held at city parks.

A task force is looking at how the city allows its parkland to be used for music festivals. One topic it’s just beginning to tackle: the fees the city charges music festival organizers.


flickr.com/bcfoto

Austin Water says it has received more than 10,000 phone calls about unusually high bills since August. So Austin City Council member Don Zimmerman proposed a solution: partial reimbursements from the city.

The only problem is, for the most part, that’s not legal.


joe_mac_1/flickr

To the chagrin of many international auto racing fans hoping to enjoy sunny Texas weather, Austin and surrounding areas are expecting heavy rain this Formula One weekend, beginning in earnest Friday night and lasting at least through Saturday. Area drivers will want to pay close attention to road conditions and be aware of road closures due to either the F1 Fan Fest or to flooding.

cover art by Ed Emshwiller, via scifi-covers.com

Back to the Future Part II lied to us. It’s 2015 and we don’t have flying cars, the Cubbies aren’t (likely) going to win the pennant, and where we’re going we most certainly need roads. Sure, hoverboards technically exist, but you’re not going to be able to hitch a ride on the back of a hover-converted Jeep any time soon.

But Back to the Future isn’t the first work of fiction to bungle utopian promises of the future, let alone the future of the Lone Star State. So, in honor of the unofficial Back to the Future Day, we’ll look back at nine times when fiction got it wrong.

Jillian Schantz Patrick/KUT News

Travis County Commissioners took up the issues of deportation and prescription medication donation at its voting session Tuesday.

flickr/deanster1983

Austin City Council members say they continue to get calls from residents with abnormally high water bills, and now one Council member is now asking the city to pay.


What We Learned at The Texas Tribune Festival

Oct 19, 2015
Image via Josh Guerra/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

This weekend, as thousands of politicians and political insiders gathered for the 2015 Texas Tribune Festival, more than a few GOP members were talking about what they plan to make a priority in the next Texas legislative session.

Here's what they told Texas Standard.  


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

A local non-profit is offering to replant trees lost along the Blanco River during the Memorial Day floods, but the trees are more than just replacements. They also might help mitigate future flooding.


KUT News

Austin City Council members are one step closer to requiring fingerprint-based background checks for Uber and Lyft drivers in the city. But the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Austin Urban League have sent a letter to City Council alleging that these kinds of background checks discriminate against minorities.


At last check, Smithville's Hidden Pines Fire has claimed 40 home structures and burned over 4,000 acres. While the fire is 25 percent contained, officials say the low humidity and dry conditions may fuel the fire for a week or more. 

With scores of firefighters from across the state coming to Central Texas to help battle the blaze, officials are requesting donations of supplies, time and money in the days ahead. Below is a list of outlets accepting assistance, as well as a map of shelters for residents, pets and livestock displaced by the Hidden Pines Fire. 

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