Austin music

Margaret Moser, Queen Of Austin, Is Dancing In The Light

Jun 22, 2017

June 18 was the beginning of a weeklong Open House at Tex Pop, the South Texas Museum of Popular Culture — a storefront wedged between a head shop and convenience store in an aging strip center at the corner of Margaret and Mulberry in San Antonio. Inside, in the largest of three rooms, museum founder and director Margaret Moser is seeing her first visitor of the day, Kathy Valentine. In an adjacent room, Moser's mother Phyllis Stegall and a niece greet arrivals as they wait their turns.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council members have delayed a vote on the so-called “agent of change” proposal, which would establish rules aimed at easing tensions between neighbors and music venues over amplified sound. An early version of the rules asked both new businesses and established venues to commit to “build accordingly to accommodate for sound.”

John Rogers/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Steve Earle. Beyonce. Buddy Holly. Geto Boys. Ornette Coleman. Ernest Tubb. Bun B. Selena. Van Cliburn. Johnny Mathis. Stevie Ray Vaughan. Did I mention Willie? If ever there were a no-brainer for Texas tourism, surely a museum of Texas music history would fit that description.

KUTX Austin

From Texas Standard:

Ten years ago, Joe Lewis – a 20-something from the Austin suburbs –  first tried to storm the stage. By day, he was delivering fish for a local seafood restaurant; by night, he was putting his unique spin on the blues that Austin was best known for. With a sound that evokes Stax and Muscle Shoals more than the cosmic cowboys, Lewis stands out in Austin.

 

The Austin music industry isn't whole. The business underlying "The Live Music Capital of the World" stands bifurcated between its lucrative festivals (SXSW principally, but Austin City Limits, Fun Fun Fun Fest and others, too) and, as studies have found, a dwindling local music scene. Austin didn't become the self-styled "Capital" solely by hosting a handful of gargantuan events, which were first born from and since have capitalized handsomely on Austin's brand to increase their now-global footprints, which have drawn outsized attention to the city.

Courtesy of Gary Floater

The holidays are a time of coming together, but they’re also a time when we think of those who are absent. Thoughts turn to loved ones distant or departed,  to the spirits of jolly old elves and to melting frosty snowmen. On Sunday at the Cheatham Street Warehouse, they will turn to a narcissistic country singer who never shows up. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

From the Austin Monitor:

The Austin Creative Alliance will step up its efforts to encourage developers to carve out arts spaces in Austin thanks to a gift that is expected to fuel a five-year push at City Hall and throughout the city.

Alex Kacha

The hit Netflix series “Stranger Things” is a supernatural thriller set in the 1980s peppered with nostalgic pop culture references and scored with a synth-heavy soundtrack by the Austin band Survive.

Alex Kacha

The Austin synthesizer band Survive composed the music for the hit Netflix thriller "Stranger Things," and now they’re riding a wave of success. We spoke to them for a story on Austin’s synthesizer music scene. Here’s part of that interview.

KUTX

More than a year to the date music venue Red 7 shuttered its doors, Mayor Steve Adler announced a plan to financially buttress the city’s live music spots in the form of a $10 million “minibond.”

KUTX

Austin Mayor Steve Adler wants to strengthen the city’s music scene. Earlier this year he introduced a series of proposals designed to do just that. Now, the city is letting the music industry weigh in on what changes they’d like to see at a series of genre-specific public meetings.

Sam Nicole Ortega for KUTX

The Austin City Council voted Thursday to investigate a long list of ideas drafted by Mayor Steve Adler to support Austin’s ailing music industry — one study says Austin saw a loss in 1,200 local jobs over four years, while another says a fifth of musicians live below the poverty line.

Adler's list of proposals, which could also benefit the creative economy as a whole, passed with near-unanimous approval at the council's meeting last night. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez for KUTX

Austin Mayor Steve Adler announced Friday morning a series of proposals he believes will strengthen the city’s music industry and help musicians keep making their art.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT News

While the music tourism industry is enjoying a boom in Austin’s city limits, the economic impact of the local music industry — the live music supported by locals during the stretches of the year that aren’t festivals — is on the decline, according to a study just released by Austin Music People


It looks like Kalu James is living the life as a musician. He's standing under a neon sign, ready to play guitar at Austin's famous Continental Club. And when he's not here, he's hustling to pay his bills.

"Being a full-time musician means you have three other side jobs, you know?" he says.

Hole in the Wall Could Close, or Not

Sep 11, 2015
Ben Philpott/KUT News

Hole in the Wall, a 41-year-old bar and music venue on The Drag that’s provided a stage for local performers for decades, may be the next venue in Austin to shut its doors forever, according to the Hole in the Wall’s manager Will Tanner.

Jenna VonHofe/KUTX

On any given night here in Austin you can find dozens of live music shows to attend.  But, according to the Austin Music Census, you're most likely to be watching a male performer on stage. Male performers outnumbered their female counterparts in the survey four to one – though women are doing a more equitable share of work behind the scenes.

Still, man or woman, musicians and the venues themselves are having a hard time grappling with Austin’s ever-rising cost of living.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

Austin music leaders are suggesting changes the city could make to protect and enliven its live music industry. On Wednesday, they presented their recommendations at Holy Mountain, a downtown venue closing its doors later this year – partly because of rising rent.

The recommendations are aimed at five issues advocates say are plaguing Austin’s music scene, including affordability of commercial space, stagnant event revenues, venue preservation, permitting and code enforcement complications and a gap in community engagement.

Roy Niswanger/flickr

Another Austin club announced it’s closing up shop. Representatives of the Cielo Property Group, the company that owns Austin Music Hall, confirmed to the Austin Business Journal that they’ll knock it down to build a 28-story office tower, with construction starting early next year.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

Last week downtown Austin music venue Holy Mountain announced it will close its doors this fall because of rising rent prices. Advocates say more music venues will begin to fall as Austin rents increase — the club's neighbor Red 7 is also staring down a rent hike. So some Austinites and out of town music-boosters are floating a solution.

A 500-plus signature petition on change.org is proposing a simple solution to the Austin City Council: rent control. 

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