Asian Grass Carp

Kevin Olivier, courtesy of Austin Carp Anglers

Standing next to Lake Austin, watching the wake of passing motorboat lick the shoreline, you likely wouldn’t think there was anything amiss. But just below the water’s surface many of the creatures that call the reservoir home are struggling for survival.  


Dan O'Keefe, Michigan Sea Grant

The battle for Lake Austin continues: 6,000 sterile Asian grass carp were released into the lake this week in an effort to combat the invasive water plant hydrilla. That brings the total number of Asian grass carp stocked in Lake Austin to 11,000 this summer and 40,000 overall.

Hydrilla is a non-native aquatic plant that has spread rapidly in Lake Austin since it was first discovered in 1999. It grows to be very thick and can clog up pipes that carry drinking water from the lake. It can also cause problems for those who use the lake for recreation.

Mary Gilroy, an environmental scientist with the City of Austin, told KUT News earlier this year that if the plants get thick enough, they pose a danger to swimmers.