Arts and Culture

Richard January/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Texas is number one in a great many things: oil, ranching, rodeo, cotton. But you may be surprised to know that we are also number one in horror. That's right, our very own charming little low-budget film, "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre," is considered by many critics to be the best (and most horrifying) horror movie ever made.


jeepersmedia/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

My favorite snack as a teenager was a Dr Pepper with salty peanuts. You remember: you pour the peanuts into the Dr Pepper and let them float around and season the drink. Didn’t get much better than that.

Dr Pepper is the oldest soft drink in America. Older than Coca-Cola, in fact, by a full year. It was created in 1885 by a pharmacist, Charles Alderton, in Waco, Texas. And its original name was Waco – it was served there at the soda fountain in the drugstore. The drink was an instant hit; customers would sit down on one of those old spinning stools and say, “Shoot me a Waco.”

 


Andreas Praefcke/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

In Texas, tacos take priority. But what do you do when you can’t find a taco place? Here are a few taco joints to put in your taco emergency box.

Mando Rayo and Jarod Neece are two taco journalists traveling across Texas tasting every taco in sight for their new book, "The Tacos of Texas". They describe what is acceptable to do when you’re really desperate for a taco – turning to fast food tacos.

 


This Texas Dance Hall Needs to Raise a (New) Roof

Oct 3, 2016
Leah Scarpelli/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Driving through a beautiful expanse of Texas Hill Country on a sunny Saturday afternoon, I pull off Highway 281 somewhere between San Antonio and Johnson City. I hear the Twin Sisters Dance Hall before I actually see it.

Twin Sisters Hall Club President Jo Nell Haas loves it here. This day’s all about raising money for a place she’s been going to her whole life.

 


Courtesy Ballet Austin

From Texas Standard:

Few parents put pen to paper to figure out how much they'll spend if their kids end up loving the activity they started at age three. For example, by the time your adorable toddler girl – who’s in love with ballet – graduates high school you will have spent as much as $100,000 on fees, tutus and training. That's according to an estimate by Dance USA.

If your daughter goes pro – her training could be as expensive as a doctor's. But ballet is not just for girls. Boys spend much less on a lifetime of ballet training.

 


East Austin Theater at the Center of Code Dispute

Aug 30, 2016
Megan K. Miller via Twitter

Austin’s Code Department is responsible for making sure land is used for its intended purpose. So what happens when those rules are broken? One East Austin theater is finding itself at the center of a code dispute.


brianswanFlickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A demonym describes the inhabitants of a place. With so many cities and counties in Texas, it's hard to keep track of who is what from where. Word scholar W.F. Strong has a helpful list to keep you on track.


Michael Bilodeau

From Texas Standard:

1. “You may all go to hell and I will go to Texas.” Davy Crockett said this angrily after losing his Tennessee bid for the U.S. Congress.

I think he really said, “Y’all can go to hell,” but grammatical purity likely corrupted the original transcription.

 


Courtesy Ann: The Ann Richards Play (Photo by Ave Bonar)

From Texas Standard:

A divorced woman who was a recovering alcoholic – a Democrat, no less – who did more than just get elected governor of Texas, she captured the American imagination. As Ann Richards was fond of saying about herself: "I walked through fire and the fire lost."

In the Land of Pickups, Texas is King

Mar 23, 2016
Flickr/biggreymare (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

To paraphrase Robert Duvall in Apocalypse Now, “I love the sound of a diesel engine in the morning.” Could be a pickup, or a tractor, or an 18 wheeler. But I love the sound, because it sounds like adventure. It is the sound that says we’re off on a road trip, or going fishing, hunting, or simply taking livestock to auction, to make more money for more adventure.


Image via malloreigh/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Eighteen-year-old Suraiya, a student from Dallas tweeted a selfie back in December.

It pictured her lying on her side in her underwear and a striped T-shirt. She was showing off her body because she was proud of it. The exposure showed her true skin color, her hip-to-waist ratio and her belly, covered in fine dark hairs. The image isn’t sexual. 

Image via Twitter/TiffsTreats

From Texas Standard:

When you think about childhood, many think of the cool feel of your skin in the rain, the flickering candles on your birthday cake and the warm bite of freshly baked cookie.

Filipa Rodrigues/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

The new trend in quilting is called modern quilting, inspired by modern art.

“Traditional quilts usually follow this column and row format and modern quilters tend to change that traditional grid pattern up,” says Heather Grant, director of marketing and programming for the Modern Quilt Guild.

 


Image via facebook/7chinesebrothers

In the U.S. entertainment industry, there’s LA, there’s New York, and then there’s Texas — at least that’s what a lot of us have gotten used to hearing. But how far away is Texas from actually being that “third coast” in the biz? And what do new reductions in film incentives to do that image?

Simon Crow/Colchester 101 Magazine

This story comes from Texas Standard.

Steven Walker has thick-rimmed glasses and full beard. He’s wearing a pearl snap shirt with a Western pattern sewn on the pockets. He looks right at home in artsy East Austin.

“People are shocked when they come in and they see all these amazing American artists on the wall and then the guy in the beard and the cowboy shirt comes up to them and says, ‘yuh alright?’ (in a British accent). It is a bit weird for them I guess,” Walker says.

Walker’s journey to Texas wasn’t direct.

Photo courtesy of Endocrine Entertainment.

Austin has a brand-new film festival and it’s all about science fiction. The first-ever Other Worlds Austin Sci-Fi Film Festival is happening this weekend.

I know what you’re thinking – just what Austin needs – another film festival. But that’s exactly what Other Worlds Austin Director of Programming Bears Fonté thought.

“I had a science fiction film a couple years ago that wound up playing about 40 film festivals. So as I was going around the country with the film, I just saw so many great science fiction films and I was like, this isn’t playing Austin and I want to do that, I want to bring those films to Austin and give those filmmakers a chance to play in front of an audience that’s going to be really receptive," Fonté says.

Lionsgate Publicity

The third film in the popular “Hunger Games” series hits theatres on Friday. To drum up anticipation for “Mockingjay Part-1," the filmmakers are traveling the globe for special premieres. So far they’ve been to London, L.A. and Austin. 

KUT sat down with Director Francis Lawrence and Producer Nina Jacobson to talk about the film and why they made a stop in Central Texas.

Audrey McGlinchy/KUT

Nearly 300 people sat cross-legged in the Texas Capitol extension’s open-air rotunda, tracing wooden sticks around crystal, brass and iron bowls.

They were there to celebrate the Dalai Lama's birthday and – with the utmost tranquility – become the largest group to ever play Tibetan singing bowls, according to the Guinness Book of World Records

A couple of years ago, enthralled with the idea of salons where writers could meet, drink, and discuss their work, Owen and Jodi Egerton decided to start one of their own. At first they'd invite other writers to their home, but quickly realized that this was an event that needed sharing.

Now, Owen hosts the monthly One Page Salon at the Whip In. The first Tuesday of every month, he invites a handful of fellow artists — fiction writers, screenwriters, songwriters, even photographers and improvisers — to join him onstage and share one page of a work in progress.

Radio XYZ

My two-week visit to Ghana has come to an end. I was in the West African country with a program through the U.S. State Department and the International Center for Journalists.

The exchange program brought journalists from Ghana, Uganda, Nigeria and Kenya to the U.S. Then, a group of American journalists is visited those African countries. I'm grateful I was chosen to visit Ghana and in my short time there I learned much about the people and culture.

Along the way, I invited you to send me questions about things you'd like to know about Ghana. Here are the answers to a few of your questions:

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