allergies

KUT News

Every spring clouds of green pollen descend on Austin, bringing misery to allergy-suffering public radio reporters like me and frustrating drivers like DeAunderia Bowens.

"You know I just got my car washed and literally got up the next morning and my car was covered with this green stuff!" she said on her way to work. "If I had a green car it would be alright, but clearly not working on a grey vehicle.”

This time of year the stuff is oak pollen, but why does its get everywhere? The answer might make you look at trees a little differently.

It turns out we are surrounded by tree sex.

Laura Rice, KUT News

It’s becoming more common for kids at school to share a classroom – or a lunchroom – with a student with food allergies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says as many as one in 15 kids in the U.S. have food allergies – and those numbers appear to be on the rise.

The issue is a serious one because kids can become very sick or die from exposure to certain foods. But kids also may feel isolated or be bullied because of the precautions they have to take.

Some local schools and parents are taking a unique route towards promoting awareness and acceptance.

Photo by Jessica Lucia http://www.flickr.com/photos/theloushe/

Have you been sneezing more this summer? A victim to itchy, watery eyes? Well, you’re not alone. Dr. Dana Sprute, the Program Director at the UT Southwestern Austin Family Medicine Residency Program, notes allergies in Austin are running higher than usual.

Cedar pollen
Image by Emily Donahue for KUT News

It's that time of the year again: the dreaded first three weeks of January when cedar pollen production peaks in Central Texas. People allergic to cedar are suffering particularly hard today because of pollen counts above 2000 grains per liter of air. Counts over 1,500 are considered "very high".