Alamo

Texas
7:28 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

A UN Takeover of the Alamo? 'Horse Hockey' Says Texas Land Commissoner

http://www.flickr.com/photos/imcom/7186596299/

The Texas Land Commissioner is responding to Internet rumors that the Alamo could be handed over to the United Nations if the San Antonio mission is designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In a statement issued today, Commissioner Jerry Patterson said reports that a UN flag would fly over the Alamo are "horse hockey," by which he means nonsense. 

The rumor gained steam when it was posted this week to InfoWars, the website owned by nationally syndicated radio host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones. It was picked up by other sites including Liberty News and Universal Free Press. And it appeared on forums like SurvivalistBoards and the Fal Files. But other bloggers were expressing concern about the UN designation at least since September.  

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Texas
5:35 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Photos: William Travis' 'Victory or Death' Letter Returns to Alamo

Travis signed his famous letter with "Victory or Death" in 1836
Tyler Pratt, KUT News

 

More on the Travis letter

In 1836, William Barret Travis famously wrote “Victory or Death” in his appeal for more troops during the Battle of The Alamo. 177 years later, the iconic letter is returning to the Alamo for a brief exhibit later this month.

Currently, the letter is safely held at Austin’s Texas State Archives and Library Building, away from the harmful UV rays that have deteriorated its condition. 

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Texas
3:02 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Historic Letter Heads 'Home' to the Alamo

William B. Travis wrote the famous letter at the Alamo in 1836.
flickr.com/gilgamesh

For the first time since it was written more than 170 years ago, the Travis letter will return the Alamo.

The famous letter—known to many as the “victory or death” letter—was written by William B. Travis to request reinforcements at the Alamo.

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission has controlled access to the letter since the early 1900’s and it has only been loaned out and displayed a few times.

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