Agriculture

Texas Pumpkin Crop Hit By Season Of Spooky Weather

Oct 10, 2017
Eve Tisler/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Due to recent unpredictable weather, farmers say, it has been more difficult than usual to get jack-o’-lantern pumpkins to Texas porches this year.

“We have seen one of the most extreme years that we have seen in farming,” says Tim Assiter, owner of Floydada Pumpkins in Floydada, Texas. 

Tyler McLaughlin/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Grape-growing experts say Texas vineyards could see another banner year this season. But vineyard owners in the High Plains, where more than 80 percent of the state's wine grapes are produced, are concerned about damage to their crops from herbicides used on nearby cotton fields. They say the chemicals are drifting into their vineyards. And that’s causing some tension among neighboring farmers.

Pravdaverita/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

Texas is making its mark on swine dining.

Acornseekers, a farm just west of Flatonia, is home to nearly 700 pure ibérico pigs – a black-hooved breed from a Spanish bloodline that can be traced back to before Roman times. Famous for their acorn-centric diet, the purebred ibérico pigs are responsible for the pork delicacy jamón ibérico.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

As farm-to-table food and restaurants have grown in popularity across the country, the idea of locally sourcing food has become especially popular in Austin. Farmers markets are popping up, and families are subscribing to community-supported agriculture programs, or CSAs. Fueling this trend are small-scale farms in and around the city.

Flickr/AgriLife Today (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Texas’ Rio Grande Valley is home to over 200,000 food-producing animals. But it’s facing a critical veterinarian shortage. That could put animals in the region at risk for disease, which could turn into a problem for humans.

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