2016 election

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke at the Travis County Expo Center last night – capping off a day of events in Fort Worth and Austin. We sent KUT’s Mose Buchele and Ben Philpott over to the rally provide full coverage of the event – inside and out – along with photographers Gabriel Cristóver Pérez and Miguel Gutierrez Jr. You can view the moments they captured in the slideshow above. 


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

It’s official. Austin voters will decide on a $720 million transportation bond come November 8. Council members took a final vote on the ballot language this afternoon, after nearly two hours of discussion. The final count? Seven council members for, three abstaining, one hard no.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is shaking up his campaign staff, after a series of missteps that led to slumping poll numbers.

Trump has tapped Stephen Bannon of Breitbart News to serve as chief executive of the campaign. Pollster Kellyanne Conway was promoted to campaign manager. Paul Manafort will stay on as Trump's campaign chairman. The Wall Street Journal first reported the news.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Democratic Vice Presidential nominee Tim Kaine stopped in Austin yesterday and met with local volunteers and supporters to thank them for their work.

While the focus of his visit was mostly to let Texas Democrats know they are important to the national party, Kaine also had to address – and strongly denounce – Donald Trump’s latest comments aimed at Hillary Clinton.


Instagram/Hillary Clinton

From Texas Standard:

Hillary Clinton gives her big speech tonight accepting the Democratic nomination at the party's convention tonight in Philadelphia.

Perhaps you caught the speech from her husband, talking about Hillary's time in south Texas.

"She met one of the nicest fellas I've ever met, the wonderful union leader Franklin Garcia," Bill Clinton said in his speech Tuesday. "He helped her register Mexican-American voters. I think some of them are still around to vote for her in 2016."

If the name Franklin Garcia sounds familiar, there's a reason for that.

 


Chaos erupted on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Committee in Cleveland, as forces opposed to Donald Trump tried — and failed — to make one last stand.

Arkansas Rep. Steve Womack brought up the Rules Committee report, which would keep delegates bound to Trump. Anti-Trump forces began shouting and wanting a roll call vote in a last-ditch effort to unbind GOP delegates and let them vote their "conscience."

Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Around this time last year, it appeared that Texas would play an outsized role in the 2016 race for the White House. A Texas senator was in the running, as well as a scion of a Texas political dynasty, a former business executive with Austin roots, the libertarian-leaning son of a longtime Texas congressman, and the longest-serving Texas governor in state history.

Allison V. Smith for the Texas Tribune

DALLAS — Donald Trump on Thursday marked the one-year anniversary of his presidential campaign with a Dallas rally that checked all the boxes for his remarkable White House bid.

Occasionally chaotic and thoroughly freewheeling, Trump rallied hundreds by reiterating his original campaign promises, reflecting on the nomination fight and talking derisively about Democratic rival Hillary Clinton. It was his first public appearance in the state since he became the presumptive GOP nominee, an improbable journey that began on June 16, 2015. 

Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A political analyst outlines three aspects of LBJ's campaign in 1964 against Republican nominee Barry Goldwater that could easily apply to Clinton's coming campaign against Trump.

 


Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton intends to rise to the challenge of that old Texas motto: Come and Take It.


Via Albizu's Facebook

From Texas Standard:

Applications for citizenship are surging right now. According to the Texas Tribune, not only is the number of naturalization applications from Texas on the rise – jumping 14 percent, according to the latest numbers – but also thousands of legal permanent residents, those with green cards, are lining up for help at citizenship workshops. Thousands more are holding up their right hands and repeating the naturalization oath at citizenship ceremonies.

Miguel Gutierrez, Jr./KUT News

From Texas Standard: 

The state broke a record for ballots cast in last week's primary. But Texas still fared poorly among other the 12 states that have held primaries, coming in second to only Louisiana in the country's lowest voter turnout so far. Our weak showing was primarily because Democrats didn't really go to the polls – just 7.2 percent of registered Democrats voted. Places like El Paso – a Democratic stronghold – had a remarkably low turnout.

Gage Skidmore via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Donald Trump won five counties in Texas on Super Tuesday. Four of those were situated along the border: Hudspeth, Terrell, Zapata, and Webb Counties. That might seem odd given the candidate's stance on immigration and building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico. Then there's Laredo mayor Pete Saenz who said he wouldn't rule out voting for Trump.

Image credit Sam Mohney

From Texas Standard:

So far this year, the State of Texas has executed three death row inmates. Ten more are scheduled to die before the end of July. At each execution are the prison warden, representatives from the press and families of prisoners and their victims. There's also a spokesperson for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

Image credit Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

The morning after the New Hampshire primary, let's consider that no so-called presidential frontrunner – in this case, Hillary Clinton – has ever lost an early primary by 20 percentage points. That may mean nothing. Or, it may mean that Bernie Sanders' talk about a political revolution is more than empty stump speech puffery.

The key to the conventions is the South, and candidates know it.

  

Ilana Panich-Linsman for KUT

Texas will start casting votes in this year’s presidential race starting Feb. 16.

For Texas Republicans, this could be yet another year the Latino vote slips through their fingers, as the rhetoric during this year’s primary could make  mobilizing Hispanic voters even harder this year.


Photo via Flickr/stephenvelasco (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

On Tuesday, New Hampshire voters will exercise their right to shape both Republican and Democratic presidential nominees’ futures. They’ll be voting in the country's second nominating process – the primaries.

Some experts believe Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders have the greatest chances for victory in New Hampshire and that wins there could give them a lot of momentum in their push for the Presidency.

 


Image credit Shelby Knowles/Texas Tribune

From Texas Standard:

If you want to understand what's happening in the nation at large, you need to understand the unusual politics of Texas. On Tuesday, a prominent advocate of the idea that "less is more" when it comes to government has a big head start on a voyage he hopes will end at the White House.

Image courtesy David Pilgreen

From Texas Standard:

The company that prints new voter registration cards is probably busy this time of year. There are tons of new eligible voters in 2016. Data from the 2010 Census tells us 7 million Texans were under 18 six years ago. Many of those people are now eligible to vote this time around.

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