News Brief
6:06 am
Mon November 7, 2011

Top Morning Stories November 7, 2011

Horns Move up in College Football Rankings

Texas has moved up in college football rankings after stomping Texas Tech Saturday. The Horns started the weekend unranked, and ended at 21 in the latest Associated Press Top 25 poll. Texas is ranked 16th in the latest BCS Standings.

UT says redshirt freshman Running Back Traylon Shead has elected to transfer. He's leaving the program after two seasons, but has not said where he's going.

Safety Commission to Discuss Wildfire Threat on 360 Corridor

The City of Austin’s Public Safety Commission today will hear how ready firefighters are in case there are more wildfires, such as the ones we saw around Labor Day. The Commission is scheduled to get a briefing from Austin Fire Department chiefs about their resources for the 360 corridor in West Austin.

Firefighters have been increasingly concerned with so-called “wild land/urban interfaces” or subdivisions surrounded by lots of trees and shrubs that make wildfires hard to combat.

New Braunfels Can Ban on the Ballot

On Election Day tomorrow, New Braunfels residents will vote on whether to ban disposable containers on their rivers. The New Braunfels City Council voted in August to ban disposable containers, including beer and soda cans, on the Comal and Guadalupe rivers because it said there’s been too much litter. But opponents gathered enough signatures to force tomorrow's vote. They say the ban would hurt tourism because many tubers like to drink while floating the rivers.

In Travis County, Vote Where You Want

Travis County election officials say 3.61 percent of the county's registered voters cast ballots during early voting ahead of Tuesday's elections. Two county bond proposals are on the ballot along with ten state constitutional amendment propositions. For the first time this election day, Travis County voters will be able to cast a ballot at any location, not just their assigned precinct.

DOD Announces Military Health Care Security Breach

The Department of Defense says about 5 million patients treated at military hospitals and clinics over the last 20 years could have been affected by a data breach. The DOD says the data involved may contain names, social security numbers, phone numbers, and some personal health information such as prescriptions. Here's more from a DOD press release:

There is no evidence any of the data has actually been accessed by a third party, and analysis shows the chance any data was actually compromised is low.  Proactive measures are being taken to ensure potentially affected patients are kept informed and protected.