Texas Women's History Month: Queen Of Dallas Sculpture

Mar 26, 2017

 

Throughout her career, Tennant sought to highlight Texas art and women's contributions to Southwestern culture.

 Allie Victoria Tennant was one of the most accomplished sculptors in Texas during a career that spanned more than five decades. Tennant became a prominent artist in the Regionalist style during the 1930s, joining a circle of artists who chose Texas themes as their subject matter. Many of her sculptures are now displayed in the Dallas Museum of Art. Her best-known public work is the monumental Tejas Warrior, which still stands at the Hall of State at Fair Park.

She also worked with great diligence as a civic leader, advancing the status of women, serving for more than 30 years as a Dallas Museum of Fine Arts trustee and teaching at the Dallas Art Institute. Tennant belonged to almost a dozen women’s clubs and art organizations, laboring in each of them to highlight the importance of the visual arts. A long-time supporter of the State Fair of Texas, she helped create the Woman’s Pavilion at Fair Park in Dallas in a successful effort to highlight female contributions to the development of Southwestern culture. 

This month, KUT is partnering with the Ruthe Winegarten Foundation to celebrate Women's History Month. Every day, we'll bring you a short feature spotlighting a historic woman, movement, or group of women in Texas.