Perry Indictment
11:15 am
Mon August 18, 2014

Here's What You Need to Know About Gov. Perry's Indictment

On Friday, special prosecutor Michael McCrum announced a Travis County grand jury decided to indict the Texas’ longest serving governor, with two felonies – one charge of abuse of official capacity and coercion of a public servant.

When Gov. Rick Perry makes his first appearance in court (at a date to be determined) he will have the charges read to him, but likely won’t face booking in the Travis County Jail, fingerprinting or a mugshot.

Below you can listen to Jennifer Stayton’s conversation with Ross Ramsey of the Texas Tribune. If you missed any of our coverage over the weekend, there’s a rundown of all KUT News’ stories surrounding the indictment after the jump.

Here’s a wrap-up of the weekend’s developments from KUT’s Ben Philpott.

Governor Rick Perry Indicted on Two Felony Charges – The full tape of special prosecutor Michael McCrum’s announcement and responses on social media from Democratic and Republican lawmakers and politicos.

TIMELINE: Governor Rick Perry’s Felony Indictment –  A comprehensive look at the case, beginning with the arrest of Travis County District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg and ending with Friday’s announcement of charges against Gov. Perry.

Demystifying Legal Language Around Perry Indictment – With any legal stories come an abundance of legalese, jargon and complex case history. This explainer provides definitions of a grand jury, indictment,

Perry Compares Indictment to IRS Scandal Perry responded yesterday, Aug. 17, on Fox News Sunday. He said the issue at hand was Rosemary Lehmberg’s arrest for drunken driving jeopardized her capacity to carry out her job not only as district attorney, but also as the head of the Public Integrity Unit, and the veto was within his power to uphold the rule of law.

Governor Perry Blasts Indictment as “Farce” – The governor held a press conference at the Texas Capitol on Saturday Aug. 16 at 2 p.m. to address the charges handed down from the grand jury. He kept his comments brief, speaking for just under six minutes, saying the indictment was politically motivated and vowing to fight the felony charges.